The German homeschooling family can stay!

The Supreme Court turned down the appeal of the Romeikes, that German  family who sought asylum in the United States after the German government threatened to take their children because they were homeschooling them.

But despite the family losing what seemed to be their final hope, the Department of Homeland Security suddenly announced that the Romeikes would be given “indefinite deferred status,” which means that they can stay in the United States after all!

 

From ‘The Romeikes Can Stay’: Good News for German Home-Schooling Family Denied Asylum | Gleanings | ChristianityToday.com:

In a dramatic 24-hour turnaround, the German family that could have faced deportation after the Supreme Court didn’t take their case has been granted “indefinite deferred status” by the Department of Homeland Security.

“We’re not entirely sure what it all means, but it’s definitely good,” Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) attorney Jim Mason told CT. “It permits them to stay in the country and work here.”

But it doesn’t answer the fundamental question raised by the Romeike family’s unusual asylum case that has pushed persecution boundaries: Is homeschooling a human right?

While the family’s immigration judge said the German government was frustrating the family’s faith by its refusal to let them home school, he was the only judge to rule that way. And the Supreme Court’s refusal to take the case seems a clear enough answer.

But even though the Supreme Court thought that the family wasn’t entitled to asylum under current law, the Department of Homeland Security apparently doesn’t want to send them back to Germany, said Mason.

[Keep reading. . . .]

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.


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