Inequality as the root of social evil?

The Pope sent out a tweet that set forth a curious moral teaching:  “Inequality is the root of social evil.”   Twitter as a genre for theological discourse has its limits, but, as Grant Gallicho points out, Pope Francis said much the same thing in his encyclical Evangelii Gaudium.   Do you think he is right?  If he is, what does that do to Roman Catholic hierarchies?

From Grant Gallicho, U.S. conservatives frightened & confused by pope’s moral world. | Commonweal Magazine.  (See the links at the site.)

Pope Francis took to Twitter to launch a new phase of Catholic Social Teaching. With just seven words he shook the foundations of the Catholic moral universe: “Inequalty is the root of social evil,” Francis wrote. Both Catholic and non-Catholic observers alike struggled to find their bearings. Joe Carter of the social-justice think tank the Acton Institute responded quickly: “Um, no it’s not. Hate and apathy are the roots of social evil.” He wondered whether Francis had “traded the writings of Peter and Paul for Piketty”–the economist whose latest book on the unfairness of capitalism has become a global phenomenon.

Catholic Culture poobah Phil Lawler also expressed skepticism, calling the pope’s tweet “a fairly radical statement, [and] as an a piece of economic analysis a very simplistic one.” He decided that the best way to understand Francis’s tweet was to go to the original Latin: that “version of this tweet is even simpler: Iniquitas radix malorum. That phrase has a somewhat different meaning.” Lawler’s Latin expertise leads him to assert that “iniquitas” might also mean “iniquity” or “injustice,” which would “make more sense,” even though the Spanish version of the tweet “admittedly looks more like the English.”

Non-Catholic Mollie Hemingway was likewise confused. “I don’t understand what this is supposed to mean, exactly,” she tweeted, later suggesting “envy and coveting” were really to blame for social evil. Former Catholic Rod Dreher found himself flummoxed too: “What does that even mean?” He continued: “Twitter pronouncements like the Pope’s are simplistic and confusing.”

It’s true. Twitter is not an ideal place to advance complex moral arguments. Wouldn’t it be better if the pope developed some of this at greater length, in, say, some sort of letter to the faithful? He might even consider exhorting his people in an apostolic manner, for example, with a title like Evangelii Gaudium or some such, perhaps under a section heading reading “The Economy and the Distribution of Income.” Come again? He’s done just that? Over the course of several paragraphs? And it’s been publicly available for months? Oh. Roll tape.

.[Keep reading. . . .for the Pope's development of this idea in his recent encyclical on economics.]

 

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X