Cancelling church

Yet more weekend snow storms. . . .Local news where we are, on the road for our “Spring Break” (!), showed lots of churches cancelling services.  I don’t remember that happening until a few years ago.  All kinds of churches were scrolling the news on the screen.  (Do Catholic churches have to get some kind of special dispensation from a bishop or somebody to do that?)   Some relatives got the news via an e-mail blast, which tells us that now the technology makes it more possible than ever before to get the word out.

What do we think about this?  I’m not sure what I think about it.  Obviously, no one wants members to get hurt trying to get to church in unsafe conditions.  There is the commandment about the Sabbath Day, but perhaps that can be kept in other ways.  And yet I still feel weird about it.   There is not attending, which can happen for lots of reasons, but not having the service available seems more problematic.  But I don’t know.  You tell me.

HT:  Jackie

The conservatives’ choice?

Three thousand conservative activists held a convention known as CPAC and were wooed by  prospective Republican presidential candidates.  In the final straw poll, Rand Paul won, for the third year in a row, with Wisconsin governor Scott Walker coming in a close second.

Jeb Bush came in fifth, despite busing in supporters to drown out the boos.  For all of his big money, he is doing poorly in the polls.  Walker, though, seems to be surging in popularity.  But CPAC showed that conservatives are tilting libertarian, not just in picking Paul.  Delegates also wanted to legalize marijuana and were opposed to new military ventures.

Who would you pick?  Do you think conservatives will rally around a standard bearer, and, if so, who?  Will their candidate get nominated?  How about elected?

[Read more...]

Why we have eyelashes

Scientists have discovered why we, as well as all mammals, have eyelashes. [Read more...]

Note on the “justifying” series

I’ve been doing a series of posts about what I am getting from a book I am reading:  Living by Faith by Oswald Bayer. (For earlier posts on the subject, see this and this. and this.)  He makes the point that the term “justification” is not just a theological term.  Rather, it is a word and a concept that we use all the time, and that, in fact, is a major preoccupation, going deep into the human psychology:  We keep being accused and condemned,  so we continually have to “justify” ourselves, proving that we are right, insisting how good we are, getting defensive, accusing and condemning our critics in retaliation.  We want approval.  We want to be accepted.  We want to be considered good, including when we aren’t.

I think the comments have showed some misunderstanding.  I wanted to draw your attention to a comment I just made to that first post:  “It isn’t that this is a bad thing. We HAVE to do it, given who and what we are. The point is that this necessity of justifying points to our underlying need for what Christ does: Justify us freely.” [Read more...]

Net neutrality or Obamanet?

The FCC voted to regulate the internet so that service providers cannot charge different kinds of users or content providers (e.g., streaming a Netflix movie) more than any others.  Some are hailing this ruling as “net neutrality,” making it possible for the internet to remain free and open.  Others are condemning these rules as  government regulation of internet that will quench innovation and create a cumbersome, poor-running “Obamanet.”  What do you think? [Read more...]

ISIS plans to sack Rome

ISIS has put out an e-book detailing its plans to sack Rome.  In doing so, it explains how it will ally with leftists.  It also gives the ISIS geo-political analysis, including the role of American weakness in its rise, its plans to temporarily take advantage of Russia’s antagonism with the West, and how Muslims can take control of Europe.  Bridget Johnson quotes from the book, which shows us how these folks think. [Read more...]


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