The political roots of atheism

Atheists are always invoking science, but notice how often their arguments and rhetoric use political language.  God allegedly “oppresses” human beings, taking away their “freedom.”  They say that God is “immoral,” that, in the words of John Lennon, if we imagine no religion, “the world would live as one.”

In fact, as Nick Spencer shows in Politico, the origins of atheism in the West had little to do with the rise of science; rather, it grew out of radical political movements.  Marxism, of course, but before that the mindset of the French revolutionaries, with their anti-clericalism and opposition to the Catholicism that was allied to the old royal order.  Many of these revolutionaries were Deists, but others took the next step of atheism.   There were, however, some countries–such as the United States–in which the church did not oppose the new “liberal” ideas, so that atheism had little traction.   After the jump, a link to Mr. Spencer’s article and an extract. [Read more...]

Igniting a second Reformation

Check out this new website, which, in turn is a forum for a new ministry and resource group whose goal is nothing less than “igniting a second Reformation.”  It’s all about Lutheran apologetics–defending Christianity and specifically defending the teachings of the Lutheran Confessions.  Not just defending, but promoting and evangelizing.  Lutherans often just talk with each other, but the idea here is getting the Word out into the world.

The initiative is called 1517 The Legacy Project.  After the jump, Dr. Rod Rosenbladt tells all about it. [Read more...]

An example of imaginative apologetics

Mathew Block asks me to give an example of imaginative apologetics. So I talk about how this is what C. S. Lewis is doing, in addition to his rational apologetics. [Read more...]

Imaginative Apologetics

From my interview with Mathew Block, in which we discuss “imaginative apologetics.” [Read more...]

Imaginative obstacles to the faith

In the interview with Mathew Block, we got into the role of the imagination in apologetics, which I discuss at length in my upcoming book with Matthew Ristuccia.  Here I discuss how many people’s difficulties with the Christian faith have to do with the way they imagine it. [Read more...]

Is Jesus just a legend?

Jesus must be either who He said He was–the Son of God–or He must have been a liar or a lunatic.  So goes the “trilemma” as developed in the apologetics of  C. S. Lewis.  But now lots of people are claiming another option, that He was simply a legend.  But was he?  And how can we persuade someone who thinks he was?

Tom Gilson, in Touchstone, offers a quite brilliant line of thought refuting that notion, in what is, in effect, a literary apologetic.  Read it all, but I give a sample after the break. [Read more...]


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