The faults of No-Fault divorce

Re-building the institution of marriage requires changing the no-fault divorce laws, argue Thomas Farr and Hilary Towers.  Another product of the 1960s, these laws have had unintended social consequences, to the point that “the only contract that is utterly unenforceable in law is marriage.” [Read more…]

The Progressive, big business alliance

Contrary to the conventional wisdom that big business is conservative, big business actually loves big government.  So argues new urbanist Joel Kotkin (a Democrat) in his new book about the actual American elites:  The New Class Conflict.  George Will reviews the book after the jump. [Read more…]

Who are the churchless?

The Barna Group has finished a major study of people who do not go to church.  (They used to be called the “unchurched”; this study calls them “churchless.”)  And it has some surprises.  For example, the churchless tend to be less educated than those who go to church, are mostly white, men, unmarried, and young.  Also, nearly two-thirds of the unchurched consider themselves to be Christians.  See Barna’s “Ten Facts” about the churchless after the jump. [Read more…]

Young people are getting better

We old fogies are always complaining about “the younger generation.”  But today’s teenagers and young adults actually have a much better record than their peers from the past (including when we old fogies were young fogies).  Crime rates, promiscuity, substance abuse, bullying, and suicide rates among young people are way, way down.  (Any ideas why that might be?) [Read more…]

Party riots

An essay in the Washington Post about the non-spontaneous riots in Ferguson, Missouri, included a digression on another kind of uprising:  the “party riot,” what some college students do when they lose or win a big game or what breaks out at Mardi Gras or other festivals when revellers just want to have a good time. [Read more…]

Eco-imperialism

Japan, where people enjoy a good cut of whale, is pushing back against international anti-whaling rules, which are allegedly nothing more than “eco-imperialism.”  According to the Japanese, it would be as if people in India who believe cattle are sacred would impose punishments on nations that eat beef.

Notice how the various sensitivities we are supposed to have–honoring cultural relativism, respecting the environment, not oppressing anyone, being tolerant of eveyone’s practices and beliefs–can be set against each other.  Can you think of other examples? [Read more…]