Be thankful for rivers

Why has America, among all the world’s nations, always been so prosperous?  Lots of reasons.  But, according to a new book, it begins with our rivers. [Read more...]

Thou shalt not covet

Chuck Bentley at the American Thinker discusses the forgotten Commandment (some might say, the forgotten two Commandments):  “Thou shalt not covet.”  He argues that coveting–that is, envy–is at the root of many of our economic, political, and cultural problems. [Read more...]

Do we need a food policy?

The food industry is the biggest sector of the economy.  Food is a major factor in health.  Food production has a major impact on the environment.  Food is a factor in policies about poverty, foreign aid, and entitlements.   Shouldn’t we have a  coherent national food policy, other than an agriculture bill that rewards farmers for producing food that isn’t necessarily good for us?  A group of food activists is making the case that we should.  See what they are proposing after the jump.

Would this just be big government infringement on liberty, or is there something to this?  What would be some free market solutions to these concerns? [Read more...]

Nobel Prize for justifying government regulation?

French economist Jean Tirole won the 2014 Nobel Prize for Economics for showing the inter-relationship between markets and government regulations.  According to Matt O’Brien’s explanation, government regulation of company’s “excess profits” is assumed to be a good thing. [Read more...]

The Nobel Prize winners

After the jump, a complete list of the 2014 Nobel Prize winners.  Which do you find especially significant? [Read more...]

The Catholic debate over liberal society

Rod Dreher describes what happened at a conference sponsored by First Things on the future of religion in the public square.  In the course of doing so, he describes a current controversy among conservative Catholics:  The “Murrayites” believe that Catholicism is compatible with American-style political and economic liberalism.  (Not so much liberalism as left-wing ideology, but the ideals of liberty, democracy, and free-enterprise economics.)  Against this view are the “radical Catholics” who believe that this liberalism is incompatible with Christianity.

Read the remarks after the jump and click on the link to Patrick Deneen’s article on the conflict.  Substitute “Christian” for “Catholic.”  Do the points still hold for Christianity in general, or does the debate hinge on specific tenets of Catholicism?  Can there be a “Murrayite” Protestantism vs. a “radical” Protestantism?  Or is Protestantism intrinsically connected to liberalism?  How about “Lutheranism,” or does the doctrine of the Two Kingdoms work for any society?

I’m curious too what the alternative is for the “radicals.”  Some kind of authoritarian regime?  The Pope at the head of an Emperor, as in the Middle Ages?

[Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X