Classical Christian education online

Homeschoolers have so many more options than they used to, particularly with internet technology.  My daughter, Joanna Hensley, has been teaching Latin and integrated humanities courses online.  These are real-time sessions, and students can see the teacher and interact with her and with each other, much like a traditional classroom.  It’s high tech, and yet classical at the same time.  I have watched her at work, and she is brilliant at this kind of teaching.  She is now at Wilson Hill Academy.  (Wilson Hill’s statement of faith is the Nicene Creed.)  I mention this now because enrollment for the next term started yesterday and some of you might want to check this out.

And while I’m plugging schools, if you would like an online classical Lutheran high school, look into Wittenberg Academy.

After the jump, a video about Wilson Hill. [Read more...]

A tale of two reading lists

Annie Holmquist compares a middle school reading list from 1908 to one from today.  It isn’t just that the latter is dumbed down in comparison, though it is.  She goes on to analyze the content of what is taught in these two sets of books and the kinds of education they exemplify. [Read more...]

The case for a North American century

Many have been saying that  America is in decline, that our political, cultural, and economic contributions are slipping. China, some say, is the up-and-coming nation.  Others say that the age of the dominant world power is over.

But an op-ed piece by former General David Petraeus and Brookings Institute researcher Michael O’Hanlon say that the United States, in partnership with Canada and Mexico, has economic and demographic advantages over all comers that may make for a “North American Century.” [Read more...]

Catholic teaching not allowed at Catholic university?

Marquette is a Roman Catholic institution affiliated with the Jesuit order, one member of which is Pope Francis.  According to Catholic author Howard Kainz, Marquette has suspended and banned from campus a tenured professor for saying that arguments against gay marriage should be allowed to be discussed in class.   Meanwhile, a theology professor who advocates abortion and now considers himself an atheist keeps teaching, with no questions asked. [Read more...]

Most public school kids are poor

Over half of the students in America’s public schools–51% overall, but in many states the number is much higher–are from families below the poverty line.

Some will say that this is because the middle class has abandoned public education, what with homeschooling, parochial and other Christian schools, and other private institutions.  But why are so many middle class families not sending their children to public schools anymore?  What could public schools do to bring them back? [Read more...]

Claiming religious exemption without the religion

The National Labor Relations Board has said that colleges, in general, must allow professors to join a union.  To objections by church-related institutions, the board said that religious institutions may be exempt only if its professors actively promote and carry out a distinctly religious mission.  If the professors in a church-related institution do NOT carry out that mission–as many church-related but only nominally Christian institutions make a point of saying–then they can not claim a religious exemption.   This poses a problem for the host of church schools that have gone secular, but it strengthens the position of theologically conservative schools.  Mark Bauerlein explains. . . [Read more...]


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