How Bill Gates gave us the Common Core

The left usually complains about the influence of big corporations in government and public policy, but the most dramatic example of that is out in the open and garnering little but praise.  That would be Microsoft tycoon Bill Gates, who is directly responsible for the implementation nation-wide of the controversial school reform program called the Common Core.

The Washington Post has a story about this, and the headline and deck says it all:  How Bill Gates pulled off the Common Core revolution:  After he bought into the plan, his money won over states, with few asking questions.  Excerpts after the jump. [Read more...]

School lunch wars

The children’s crusade against big government that we’ve blogged about earlier is intensifying, as kids are rebelling against the healthier lunch room fare–ignoring fruits & vegetables, protesting whole wheat facsimiles of culturally significant foods like biscuits and tortillas, and filling the garbage bins with other nutritious food that they just don’t like–required by federal guidelines against childhood obesity.

School officials, deploring the waste, are asking for more flexibility in what they can offer in their lunchrooms, and Republicans are pushing for some changes.  Democrats, as is their wont, are blaming corporations, rather than the consumers, for trying to change the guidelines, with one target being that great patron of Lutheran causes Schwan Foods, which supplies 75% of the nation’s lunchrooms with the pizza school children crave. [Read more...]

Harvard’s Black Mass

Harvard University will hold a Black Mass this evening, sponsored by the Cultural Studies Club and conducted by New York Satanists.  Though the rite centers upon the profanation of a Communion wafer–usually sexual, according to Wikipedia, probably having something to do with the naked woman on the altar–the club is assuring the public that a consecrated Host will not be used.

UPDATE:  The club now says that the Black Mass will be held off-campus.

UPDATE:  The club now says that it could not find a venue and that it will no longer sponsor the event.  The organized prayers against the Black Mass must have worked!

[Read more...]

Meet me in St. Louis–for CCLE conference

The Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education will be holding its annual conference July 15-17 in St. Louis on the beautiful, historic gothic campus of Concordia Seminary.  This year there will even be child care!

I’ll be there–talking about George Herbert, the Christian poet whom I’ve been featuring here lately–along with many others (check out the list along with links to registration details after the break).  Show up and we can have a Cranach summit meeting! [Read more...]

Bible reading in the digital age

In answer to my question about how reading conditioned by the internet might affect the way people read the Bible, Rev. Lucas Woodford (my former pastor) pointed to this article by Robin Phillips published in Touchstone in 2012, which also gets into the various ways reading itself has already changed over the centuries.  An excerpt after the jump. [Read more...]

Classical education goes to the movies

Classical education does quite a bit with aesthetics and encourages deep reflection on works of art.  Thanks to James Banks for alerting me to a new website entitled FilmFisher.  It features movie reviews by classical educators and their students, as mentored by the classical educators.  The discussions of the films–which thus far include Noah, 300, American Hustle, Gattaca, Non-Stop–are very perceptive, going far beyond the usual reductionistic Christian movie reviews.  (Some of you high school or college students should sign up to be a reviewer!) [Read more...]


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