“Family Vocation” giveaway

GoodReads is giving away five copies of Family Vocation:  God’s Calling in Marriage, Parenting, and Childhood.  I wrote that book with my daughter Mary Moerbe.

It goes beyond God at Work, not just in exploring the family vocations in depth–important in itself, if we want to revitalize Christian marriage and parenting–but also in including material on vocation in general that I learned after publishing that earlier book.

All you do is click “Enter Giveaway” on the widget after the jump.  Five entrants will be randomly chosen.  If you are one of them, you will get the book in the mail.  The contest will go through the month of September.

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Young men living the dream

Research shows that young men 18-30 are more likely to be living with their parents than with a woman.  And that the large number of the unemployed in this demographic are not only living with their parents but spending virtually all of the time they would normally be working playing video games.

But here is the kicker:  They LIKE living this way.  It isn’t that poor economic prospects are causing them to retreat into a depressing isolation.  They consider this a good life.  Expending their sexual impulses in internet pornography, rather than marriage or dating that could lead to marriage, and channeling all of their aggression into first person shooters, instead of the military or ambition or earning a living or protecting a family, this generation is happy, content, and living the dream.

So says Samuel D. James, drawing on the research of Erik Hurst and the insights of Russell Moore, excerpted and linked after the jump.

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“A Christian and a Feminist Almost Agree on Stuff”

From Hans Fiene of Lutheran Satire.  (HT:  Kerner):

Pope says most married people aren’t really married

Roman Catholicism famously doesn’t believe in divorce.  But it does believe in annulments, a procedure which determines that for one reason or another–immaturity, not knowing what they are getting into, etc.–a valid marriage never took place.

The implication is that many couples who had a church wedding and a marriage license, who have had children together, and who have lived their whole lives together are not really married.  I suppose this comes out if the couple wants to break up the marriage and, if they are Catholic, receive an annulment, but even if they stay together, they can never really know if they are married.

I would say that, from a Lutheran perspective,  this is another example of Roman Catholicism’s being not nearly sacramental enough.  Catholics believe that marriage is a sacrament, but the objective sacrament doesn’t make the marriage, just the subjective experience of long ago when they first became married.  Similarly, Catholics can’t really know if they have been saved, even though they have been baptized, received Holy Communion, etc.

This is also an example of legalism in religion, in which laws that are too difficult to fulfill are, in practice, weakened by creating technicalities and loopholes that make it easier to accomplish while defeating the whole purpose of the original law.  (If you don’t believe in divorce because marriage is a sacrament and thus permanent, don’t have annulments either!  These are just divorces by another name, even though they “save the appearances” of permanent marriage by declaring that a marriage never happened, though at the expense of your whole sacramental theology.)

Anyway, the Pope last week said that, because of the lack of commitment, “the great majority of our sacramental marriages are null.”  His handlers later edited the original transcript to change “the great majority” to “some,” but still. . . .If so many people who have gotten married are really just living together, committing fornication and their children illegitimate (to use other Catholic categories), then the line between wedlock and cohabitation is fatally blurred.  If marriage, however, is a VOCATION, a calling from God, it’s a different story. [Read more…]

How mothers battle totalitarianism

“Motherhood is the first and last line of defense against totalitarianism.”  So says Stella Morabito in The Federalist, where she takes up the question of why tyrants always try to undermine the family and explains how mothers are a bulwark for liberty. [Read more…]

Motherhood as a sacred vocation

For a good Mother’s Day meditation, read R. J. Grunewald’s piece from last year, “The Vocation of Motherhood,”  quoted after the jump.  I say that not because he quotes me but because motherhood really is a sacred calling.

God really does work through mothers to create new immortal souls and to care for, nurture, and shape them.  Mothers love and serve their neighbors–their children–in a way that is especially important and holy.  This is true even when mothers have to bear the cross in their vocation–the difficulties, the exhaustion, the frustrations, and the heartbreak that also characterize motherhood.   [Read more…]