Confessions of a liberal parent

The Washington Post has a touching and rather humorous piece on the following theme:  “I’m a diehard, bleeding-heart liberal. And it’s ruining my parenting.” [Read more...]

Discovery of how to keep young people in the church

A new study has discovered what is being called the “holy grail” for keeping teenagers in the church when they become adults:  Parents.   If their parents talked about their faith at home, showed that their faith is important to them, and were active in church, 82% of their children became similarly religious as adults.  The connection is “nearly deterministic,” according to one researcher. [Read more...]

Family synod’s final statement is more conservative

The initial statement from the Roman Catholic synod on the family was hailed for its welcoming language for divorced Catholics and same-sex partners, but the final version emphasized more traditional moral teachings.  But votes on the sections show a very divided group of bishops.  The deliberations will continue next year with a broader selection of participants. [Read more...]

Vatican pushes back against initial report

There are liberal Catholics and there are conservative Catholics.  The latter faction at the Synod on the Family is criticizing the revisionist views of sexual morality that appeared in a preliminary working document. (See here and here.) [Read more...]

Synod says, look for the good in gay & non-marital unions

More from the first working document from the Catholic synod on the family:  The Church should “appreciate the positive values” that can be found in gay unions and with couples living together out of wedlock.  Traditional marriage, it says, is “ideal,” but the synod is raising the question, “What good can we find” in non-marital unions? [Read more...]

Catholic family synod & liberal Protestantism?

The first document from the Catholic synod on the family–which is considering divorce, cohabitation, homosexuality, etc.–says that the church should tone down its application of doctrine, advocates “gradualism” in salvation, affirms that sanctification can take place apart from the church and its sacraments, says that the church should tailor its teachings to “people’s real problems,” and calls for “courageous pastoral choices.”  (What do you think that means?  Aren’t these formulations based on existentialism rather than Thomistic natural law?)

Without simply proclaiming Christ’s forgiveness–apparently, those outside the church’s blessing are not even allowed to confess their sins and receive absolution!–the document tries to establish a new “tone.”  My question:  How is this any different from liberal Protestantism? [Read more...]


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