The Cranach Super Bowl party!

You are all invited to the Cranach Institute virtual Super Bowl party!  It will be located at this blog and it will last all weekend.  Please bring your own food and beverages.

The Green Bay Packers, my team, were 5 minutes away from getting to go to the Super Bowl when the Seattle Seahawks made a miraculous comeback.  My interest in the Super Bowl plummeted.  I would be for the New England Patriots.  But then that interest deflated.  I guess I’ll be a disinterested observer.  But almost everybody’s team doesn’t make it into the Super Bowl, but we celebrate anyway in what has become a grassroots American holiday.

This blog can be your one-stop site for Super Bowl XLIX.  (Don’t you love the classicism in the Roman numerals?)  And if anyone asks if you have been invited to a Super Bowl party, say, “Why, yes.  I have been.”  That’s fine if you go to an actual Super Bowl party.  You can discreetly check on the live-blogging on your phone.  But if you are not going to an actual Super Bowl party or if you don’t want to go to one and need an excuse not to, say, “I’m going to the Cranach party.”

To begin with, this post is the place for your predictions.  Not only who wins and what the score is, but what do you think will happen?  Will this game feature some big controversy like the playoff games did?  Blown calls, refused calls, deflated footballs?  Will Katy Perry try to shock the world in the halftime show?  Or what?  And what will it all mean?

UPDATE:  Well, that was fun!   Now the Seahawks know how the Packers felt, losing after thinking they had the game won, thanks to an amazing comeback.  Thanks to everyone who came here during the game, particularly to the live-bloggers.  The good thing about a virtual party is that we had to do very little cleanup!

 

Does God determine who wins the Super Bowl?

Last year a respected research institute found that 50% of sports fans believe supernatural forces are at work in sporting events.  That includes 19% who believes that God determines the outcome, 26% who pray for their team to win, and 25% who believe their team has been cursed.  More recently it’s been reported that 25% of Americans believe that God will determine who wins the Super Bowl.  (See this.)

Now the obvious response is to be indignant and say that’s ridiculous.  God doesn’t care about such trivialities as who wins a football game.  But wait a minute.  If God cares about the fall of a sparrow, why wouldn’t he care about the fall of a wide receiver?  If God’s providence extends to all of reality, why wouldn’t that include football games?

So what do you think about this?  Apply actual theology in answering this question one way or the other.

[Read more...]

Live-blog the Super Bowl

Here is where you can comment on the Super Bowl as the game is unfolding.  Comment on the plays, analyze what you see happening, complain about mistakes, talk trash, get into sports arguments, whatever you want.

Live-blog the Super Bowl commercials

A curious development in the history of the NFL championship game has been the role of commercials.  Viewership is so huge for the big game that ad agencies have been going all-out to come up with the best commercials they can devise.  So commercials have become themselves a beloved part of the festival.  And for much of America whose teams didn’t make it into the game and for people who don’t care that much about football at all but go to watch parties anyway, the commercials are the best part.

So this is the place to live-blog the commercials.  Which ones work and which ones don’t?  Which is the best?  Which ones are really bad?  Which ones are clever, funny, or mildly amusing?  Do any of them actually make you want to buy their products?  Are any of them as good as this one?

The Patriots cheated!

The NFL has determined that the New England Patriots used under-inflated footballs, which are easier to throw in bad weather, in the victory over Indianapolis that sent them to the Super Bowl.  Patriot coach Bill Belichick also cheated against St. Louis in 2007 when he was found to have spied on a practice, affecting another Super Bowl-related game.

The penalty for this kind of thing is a minimum $25,000 team fine, plus maybe the loss of a draft pick.  But doesn’t this merit forfeiting the game and, this being a second offense, the banning of the coach from the game? [Read more...]

Why do the winners riot?

Ohio State beat Oregon to win the collegiate football championship, the first one under the new playoff system.

Question:  Why in America do fans of the winners of big games riot, setting fires, breaking things, threatening cops?  In other countries, sports violence is a problem, but my impression is that it’s usually losers and fans who feel cheated who start tearing up things.

To switch to the NFL, I don’t think Detroit fans rioted when the penalty flags against Dallas were picked up, and no one rioted in Dallas when an apparent catch was ruled incomplete in the game won by Green Bay [hooray!].  And there were no riots in Oregon.  But the victorious Ohio State fans felt so happy that they set 89 fires. [Read more...]


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