Checking your predictions for 2014

You readers made some pretty good predictions last year.  More than one of you predicted that gasoline prices would drop, that more states would legalize gay marriage and marijuana possession, that the Supreme Court would rule in ways that they did, in fact, rule.  Some mentioned North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, including that he would be assassinated, but that vision must have been of the movie “The Interview.”  With some predictions, to be perfectly honest, I’m not sure if they happened or not!

I invite you to read them over at Your predictions for 2014 and propose your own winners and honorable mentions.

But the winner of this year’s prize for best prognosticator goes to. . . [Read more...]

The funny year in review

One of my long-time customs leading up to New Year’s is to read Dave Barry’s annual year in review.  I like the month-by-month survey of what happened in the previous year.  And that his commentary is hilarious. [Read more...]

Top news stories of 2014

The Associated Press released results of its poll of news directors and editors on what they considered to be the top ten news stories of 2014.   The winner:  The police killings of Michael Brown and Eric Garner and the consequent protests.  This beat out Ebola and the rise of ISIS, which were #2 and #3, respectively.

See the complete list after the jump.  What do YOU consider the biggest story or  most important development of 2014? [Read more...]

Why Christmas is on December 25

Touchstone has reposted its most popular article, the scholarly treatment by historian William J. Tighe from 2003 about why the birth of Jesus is celebrated on December 25.  And, as he definitively shows, it has nothing to do with any pagan festival. [Read more...]

The myth that Christ is a myth

The arguments are going around that Jesus Christ was little more than a mash-up of ancient mythical figures.  It is true that, as C. S. Lewis has said, that myths–such as those about death and resurrection–often do find their fulfillment in Christianity, in which, in Lewis’s words, “myth became fact.”

But that isn’t what these folks are arguing; rather, they show that they understand paganism no better than they understand Christianity.  Their assertions are just flat-out wrong when it comes to the most basic facts about the myths. [Read more...]

What a Shakespeare folio does not prove

A copy of the 1623 folio of Shakespeare’s collected plays has been discovered as part of a former Jesuit library in France.  This has re-ingnited speculation that Shakespeare was a Roman Catholic.  But, as Shakespeare scholar David Scott Kastan points out, that a Jesuit would own a copy of a Shakespeare book published after his death proves no such thing.  In fact, another folio in another Jesuit library was heavily censored for what the owners back then considered anti-Catholic sentiments. [Read more...]


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