The youth who stopped Pickett’s Charge

President Obama will reward the Congressional Medal of Honor to two  Viet Nam War vets, Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and, posthumously, Specialist Donald P. Sloat (who jumped on a grenade to save three comrades). Also winning the nation’s highest honor posthumously is Lt. Alonzo Cushing, a 22-year-old who commanded an artillery battery that took the brunt of Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg.  Read what he did after the jump.

 

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The political roots of atheism

Atheists are always invoking science, but notice how often their arguments and rhetoric use political language.  God allegedly “oppresses” human beings, taking away their “freedom.”  They say that God is “immoral,” that, in the words of John Lennon, if we imagine no religion, “the world would live as one.”

In fact, as Nick Spencer shows in Politico, the origins of atheism in the West had little to do with the rise of science; rather, it grew out of radical political movements.  Marxism, of course, but before that the mindset of the French revolutionaries, with their anti-clericalism and opposition to the Catholicism that was allied to the old royal order.  Many of these revolutionaries were Deists, but others took the next step of atheism.   There were, however, some countries–such as the United States–in which the church did not oppose the new “liberal” ideas, so that atheism had little traction.   After the jump, a link to Mr. Spencer’s article and an extract. [Read more...]

Alexander Hamilton on religion

July 11 was the 210th anniversary of the death of Alexander Hamilton, who was killed in a duel with the sitting vice president Aaron Burr.  Hamilton was one of the important founders, having written most of the Federalist Papers, being a key aide to General Washington, and organizing the foundations of the American economy.  He well deserves to be on the ten dollar bill.  But, according to Mark Movsesian, “he also wrote one of the most important texts on the place of religion in American public life.” [Read more...]

Lessons from Bastille Day?

Today is Bastille Day, marking the beginning of the French Revolution in 1789.  There were some major differences between that and the American Revolution, but there were some major similarities too.  What can we learn from them both?  We celebrated our country on July 4, but maybe this could be a time for some healthy self-criticism. [Read more...]

The street and the altar

The Lutheran pastor, Christian Führer, whose prayer meetings became a catalyst for the protests that overthrew Communism in East Germany died Monday at age 71.

I was struck by this quotation from him:  “It is not the throne and the altar, but the street and the altar that belong together.”  That’s an interesting version of the doctrine of the Two Kingdoms.   That concept is often taken to refer just to the relation of the church to earthly governments.  That’s part of it, but I think it applies more broadly to society and culture as a whole, where God is also active in vocation and in caring for His creation. [Read more...]

The father of modern journalism: Martin Luther

World Magazine editor Marvin Olasky writes about how an independent press has its roots in the Reformation.   Modern journalism began, he says, with an unusually skillful writer named Martin Luther. [Read more...]


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