Confessions of an ex-liberal theologian

Thomas C. Oden is a prominent theologian who formerly was a major practitioner of liberal, modernist theology.  But then, after reading the Church Fathers, he did an about face, turning to orthodox, historical Christianity.  He tells his story in A Change of Heart:  A Personal and Theological Memoir.

This is the most stimulating and illuminating book that I have read in a long time, giving an inside look at the construction of liberal theology, explaining what happened to mainstream Protestantism, and describing in novelistic detail how a prominent scholar came back to an authentic Christian faith.

Reading this book, published a couple of years ago, was an especially strange experience for me because Oden’s background and mine are so similar!  Though he is 20 years older than I am, our experiences have been so similar or at least parallel that reading about them is like reading about my own life.  [Read more…]

The magnitude of human sin

One of my most formative memories is when I was ten years old and the Holocaust administrator Adolf Eichmann was on trial.  The four TV channels covered his trial, as he sat smirking behind a screen of bullet proof glass, and showed a number of documentaries about the Nazi genocide.  Those black and white television images of piles and piles of human bodies, along with the accounts of what happened in the death camps, shook me to my core.  My parents let me watch it, and I’m glad they did.  It showed me in a way I have never forgotten the magnitude of human sin.

The memories came back because Elie Wiesel, the Auschwitz survivor and chronicler of the Nazi genocide, died at the age of 87. [Read more…]

The Weimar problem

From George Will:

“Every republic,” writes Charles Kesler, professor of government at Claremont McKenna College, “eventually faces what might be called the Weimar problem.” It arrives when a nation’s civic culture has become so debased that the nation no longer has “the virtues necessary to sustain republican government.”

Read my comments and questions after the jump.

[Read more…]

Exposing the forgery about Jesus’s wife

The Atlantic has published a piece of investigative journalism on the source of the manuscript fragment that has Jesus referring to “my wife.”  Though heralded by Harvard professor Karen King, other scholars have argued from internal evidence that the fragment is a forgery.   This article pretty much finishes off any possibility that it is authentic by exposing the man who first came up with the manuscript–an expert in ancient manuscripts, a pornographer, and a New Age gnostic, with a very shady record–and the scholar who wrote about it without ever bothering to check on where the fragment came from. [Read more…]

Secret Service agent says Hillary is unstable and violent

We may have a president who is being described as “volcanic, impulsive, enabled by sycophants, and disdainful of the rules set for everyone else.”  No, not Donald Trump.  Hillary Clinton.  A former White House secret service agent, Gary Byrne,  has written a book soon to be released entitled  “Crisis of Character: A White House Secret Service Officer Discloses his Firsthand Experience with Hillary, Bill, and How They Operate.”

It reportedly gives shocking accounts of what went on behind closed doors in the Clinton White House, including Hillary physically assaulting her husband, leaving him bruised and bleeding, and her violent tirades against staff and the agents sworn to protect her.  The book won’t be released until June 28, but it is already the #1 bestseller on Amazon.  After the jump, details from the publisher’s advance release material.

So now both presidential candidates are said to be “temperamentally unsuited” for the job!

[Read more…]

“Bring to his work a mighty heart”

In observance of today’s holiday, the Daily Oklahoman printed excerpts of a Memorial Day address by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., in 1889, when the memory of the Civil War was still fresh.  You’ve got to read this speech.  It features an eloquence and a depth of sensibility that we almost never hear today, certainly not from politicians or other public figures.

He talks about the honored dead, of course, but he also makes applications about what the generations that follow can learn from them and from observing Memorial Day.

I give a brief sample after the jump, but please click the link and read the whole thing. [Read more…]


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