Parents who regret having children

8667992858_ef623594a5_zA new category of victims has emerged in feminist and other progressive circles:  “regretful parents.”  These are mothers and fathers (but mostly mothers) who are coming out about regretting that they had children.

This “breaking of a taboo” against admitting the feeling seems related to the attempt to normalize abortion.  Not wanting a child is portrayed as valid and liberating, even after the child is born.

Ironically, regretful parents insist that they still love the child.  Even as they wish that he or she didn’t exist.

As Alexandra DeSanctis points out, this movement shows profound confusion about parenthood, love, and life in general.  As if “having a child is valuable only as long as it is rewarding.”

[Read more…]

Starving patients to death

starvation_by_ivnkadsyra-d4f57bcEuthanasia laws have a way of expanding.  Once a society accepts the concept that sick people should be “put out of their misery,” the benefit can be applied ever more broadly–to those who are not terminally ill, just depressed; to people who cannot give consent; to the mentally handicapped; to children.  What begins as a humane-sounding way to end heart-breaking suffering, to be used only in rare and carefully defined cases, turns into something ever-more brutal.

Oregon legalized assisted suicide in 1997.  A new law would allow caregivers to deny food to those who have written an advance-care directive allowing for non-treatment.  Not just intravenous nutrition, but actual eating and drinking, even if the patient is hungry and wants to eat. [Read more…]

The death and new life of “Jane Roe”

Norma_McCorvey_(Jane_Roe),_1989_(cropped)Norma McCorvey, who went by the name of “Jane Roe” in the infamous Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion nationwide, has died at the age of 69.

After winning the Supreme Court case, McCorvey became active in the pro-abortion movement.  But the kindness of a pro-life demonstrator at an abortion clinic led to her conversion to Christianity.

She then became a pro-life activist, battling the abortions that in another life she made legal.

The Associated Press obituary, excerpted and linked after the jump, has some fascinating details about her life, such as these:  During the Roe v. Wade case, she claimed that she needed an abortion because she was pregnant due to rape, but she later admitted this was a lie.  She was basically used by feminist activists who ran with her case and took it to the Supreme Court.  She became involved in a lesbian relationship, but after she became a Christian, they became celibate.  After her conversion, she was an evangelical, but she later become Roman Catholic.

Her life is a remarkable testimony to the grace of God, who redeems sinners and changes them. [Read more…]

Bringing back the woolly mammoth

The two kinds of romantic love

8096547973_367546a4eb_zOne kind of romantic love leads to life–to marriage, fruitful sexuality, children, family, virtue.  The other kind of romantic love leads to death–to sin, sterile sexuality, abortion, family destruction, ruin.

These two kinds of romantic love are explored in one of the most morally illuminating books of literary criticism I have ever read:  Love in the Western World by the Swiss Christian scholar Denis de Rougement.

A romance novel will often set up a triangle in which a woman has to choose between two suitors:  One is a good guy who cares for her, whom her parents like, and who would make a good husband.  The other is nearly a villain, an “anti-hero” who sometimes mistreats her, is a social outcast from her circles, and who even seems dangerous.  Young adults novels are often built around the same pattern,  with the choice between an all-American popular boy and a troubled, misunderstood, passionate “bad boy.”  Many literary novels have been about a happily married man who is lured away from his angelic wife by an exotic, sensual, forbidden beauty.

Sometimes the characters make the right choice in committing themselves to the good person.  But, more often than not, they choose the one who is bad “in society’s eyes,” but who offers them excitement, passion, and the thrill of transgression.  Romance and young adult novels often stop when the choice is made, imposing a “happily ever after ending.”  But honest works of literature, like Anna Karenina, show what happens next, with the forbidden love resulting in ruin, despair, and even death.

More importantly, the pattern keeps asserting itself in real life.   [Read more…]

Selling abortions

Abortion is Planned Parenthood’s product.  Like other businesses, Planned Parenthood imposes sales quotas and uses sales techniques to maximize purchase of their product.

The abortion provider, which poses as a center for women’s health, gives its clinics specific quotas for the numbers of abortions they must provide or refer.   And employees learn sales pitches to manipulate women into getting abortions.

This is documented in another video from Live Action:

[Read more…]