If you embrace nature, embrace natural law

The Pope’s encyclical “Laudato Si” is winning fulsome praise from the left for its embrace of environmentalism.  But, as the editors of The Stream point out, those folks aren’t saying anything about 11 other teachings in that document that don’t accord so well with the spirit of the times.  These include the condemnation of abortion, a rejection of sexual immorality, and a tempering of feminism.  (See the 11 after the jump.)

The Pope is indeed advocating environmentalism, but he is doing so in the context of a larger theological perspective on matter, the physical universe, and objective reality.  Let me sum it up this way:  Embrace nature, but that means also embracing the natural purpose of sex (conceiving children), the natural body (so no transgenderism), the natural difference between men and women (so feminism will have its limits), and natural law in general (the connection of moral truth to objective reality).

We can still quarrel with the Pope’s environmentalism and his theology, but he is working from a worldview that flies in the face of most postmodernists who, in believing that there is no objective reality they are subject to, reject the very concept of nature.  That number includes, ironically, many environmentalists. [Read more...]

Pro-abortion activists plan new strategy

The strategy of abortion apologists up to now has been to employ euphemism (“pro-choice”) and use extreme situations (rape, incest) to make their case.  Activists have now decided that to “normalize” abortion and to present it as a good thing, they need to use the word they used to draw away from, “abortion,” and emphasize the vast majority of cases motivated by convenience.  And, of course, as in the rhetorical move that can be used to justify about anything to a sentimental public, they will put a “human face” on the issue by having sympathetic women who have had abortions tell their “stories.” [Read more...]

Appeals court upholds abortion restrictions

Pro-lifers have been battling abortion on the state level by pushing legislation requiring that abortion clinics meet the same standards as hospitals and other surgical centers.  This has been putting abortion clinics out of business.

Pro-abortion activists have challenged those laws.  But a federal appeals court has ruled that the state of Texas, which enacted one of the strictest set of regulations, has every right to regulate abortion clinics in this way.  This sets up an appeal to the Supreme Court.  But, in the meantime, the number of abortion clinics in Texas will dwindle from 41 to 7. [Read more...]

How Christianity humanized children

One of the many cultural influences of Christianity, observes Eric Metaxas, discussing a book on the subject, was the practice of treating children as human beings of great value.  That was not how children were treated in the ancient pre-Christian world.  Notice too that now that the Christian cultural consensus is unravelling, we have already dehumanized the unborn child and have started to dehumanize infants. [Read more...]

Is the religous right finished?

Are religious conservatives finished as a political and cultural force?  Not at all, argues David French, responding to someone who claims that Mike Huckabee’s inevitable defeat will put the nails in the coffin of the Christian right.

French says that Christian conservatives don’t have to vote for Huckabee because every other Republican candidate are claiming their issues.  Furthermore, back in the Sixties, the left had essentially taken over America’s churches, but now the mainstream theological liberals have dwindled to near insignificance, while evangelicals and other theological conservatives dominate American Christianity and have had a cultural impact, especially on life issues.

Read his argument after the jump.  Is he right or wrong?  Or only partially right or partially wrong? [Read more...]

Hillary says “religious beliefs. . .have to be changed”

Hillary Clinton says that “religious beliefs. . .have to be changed” when they interfere with “reproductive health care” (that is, abortion).  And pro-abortion laws “have to be backed up with resources and political will.”

Notice that she doesn’t say “religious beliefs have to change.”  That would arguably be bad enough, but it allows for religions to change themselves, from within, perhaps over time.  Instead, she said religious beliefs have to “be changed.”  The passive construction here means  that religious beliefs have to be acted upon from the outside.  Nor did she say, “religious beliefs should change,” expressing a moral opinion. No, they “have to” be changed, an imperative, as in giving an order.  Then when she throws in that line about “political will,” the language is clearly that of government suppression.

[Read more...]


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