An example of imaginative apologetics

Mathew Block asks me to give an example of imaginative apologetics. So I talk about how this is what C. S. Lewis is doing, in addition to his rational apologetics. [Read more...]

How God uses the imagination

More from my interview with Mathew Block, who asks how God uses our human imaginations to reach us. [Read more...]

New literary biography of George Herbert

There is a new literary biography of the 17th century Christian poet George Herbert.  It’s entitled Music at Midnight: The Life and Poetry of George Herbert, by John Drury.  The book pays close attention to Herbert’s Christian faith and to close readings of his poetry.  That Herbert’s stock is going up is evident in the enthusiastic reviews the book is getting.  After the jump, a link to one in the Washington Post and excerpts from others.  (I wrote my dissertation and published my first book on Herbert.) [Read more...]

Law and Gospel in a short fairy tale

Will McDavid at Mockingbird quotes “The Ungrateful Son,”  an extremely short fairy tale from the Brothers Grimm.  Here it is:

Once a man and his wife were sitting outside the front door with a roast chicken before them which they were going to eat between them. Then the man saw his old father coming along and quickly took the chicken and hid it, for he begrudged him any of it. The old man came, had a drink, and went away.

Now the son was about to put the roast chicken back on the table, but when he reached for it, it had turned into a big toad that jumped in his face and stayed there and didn’t go away again.

And if anybody tried to take it away, it would give them a poisonous look, as if about to jump in their faces, so that no one dared touch it. And the ungrateful son had to feed the toad every day, otherwise it would eat part of his face. And thus he went ceaselessly hither and yon about the world.

What  can we learn from this rather bizarre folktale?  After the jump, see what McDavid makes of it. [Read more...]

Is Jesus just a legend?

Jesus must be either who He said He was–the Son of God–or He must have been a liar or a lunatic.  So goes the “trilemma” as developed in the apologetics of  C. S. Lewis.  But now lots of people are claiming another option, that He was simply a legend.  But was he?  And how can we persuade someone who thinks he was?

Tom Gilson, in Touchstone, offers a quite brilliant line of thought refuting that notion, in what is, in effect, a literary apologetic.  Read it all, but I give a sample after the break. [Read more...]

The world’s eucatastrophe

Thanks to Rev. Sam Schuldheisz who posted passages from J. R. R. Tolkien on “eucatastrophe,” a word he coined for “the sudden happy turn in a story which pierces you with a joy that brings tears.”  Tolkien then developed the idea that the eucatastrophe of history is the Birth of Christ, and the eucatastrophe of the Incarnation is His resurrection. [Read more...]


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