A supercomputer didn’t really pass the Turing Test

The media reported that a supercomputer passed the Turing Test, a measure of artificial intelligence in which a computer can pass as a human being.  But it turns out that this is just one of the many examples tracked on this blog (as some of you commenters have pointed out) of incompetent reporting on science and technology.  Here is a link to the big story.  Then, after the jump, a link to a tech site debunking the claim, along with some specific points that the article got wrong. [Read more...]

The father of modern journalism: Martin Luther

World Magazine editor Marvin Olasky writes about how an independent press has its roots in the Reformation.   Modern journalism began, he says, with an unusually skillful writer named Martin Luther. [Read more...]

Associated Press will shorten the news

We’ve blogged about the findings that the internet has diminished people’s ability to read long, complex texts.  Now the leading practitioner of print journalism is giving in to the trend.  The Associated Press wire service has ordered its reporters to keep their stories no longer than 500 words. [Read more...]

Two conservative atheists

Being a Christian is not the same as being a conservative, and being a conservative is not the same as being a Christian.  Two prominent conservative columnist, George Will and Charles Krauthammer, have come out as atheists, though of the sort that “respect religion and religious people.” [Read more...]

Snowden revelations win Pulitzer Prize

The London Guardian and the Washington Post won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service for publishing the revelations from Edward Snowden about the extent of NSA snooping.   After the jump, an excerpt and link to the complete slate of winners.  What does this list suggest about the role of journalism in this internet age? [Read more...]

Bible reading in the digital age

In answer to my question about how reading conditioned by the internet might affect the way people read the Bible, Rev. Lucas Woodford (my former pastor) pointed to this article by Robin Phillips published in Touchstone in 2012, which also gets into the various ways reading itself has already changed over the centuries.  An excerpt after the jump. [Read more...]


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