Coming back to the power outage

When we came into our house after our vacation, we found that our technology fast was continuing.  We had no electricity.   We came back to the great power outage of 2012.

We had heard people talking in the airport before our connecting flight about the big storm–the straight winds of over 80 miles an hour known as a derecho  (Spanish for “straight,” as opposed to a tornado, meaning “turning”) that hit the country, knocking out power for millions in the D.C. area.  When we drove into the small town where we live, the first stop light was out, but then the others seemed to be working, as were the lights in shops and the loudspeaker at the Little League park near our home.  But when we unlocked the door and walked into our house, we stepped into a blast furnace.  No air conditioning, no lights, no kitchen appliances, no internet.  The landline didn’t work either, which usually doesn’t happen when the electricity goes, and our cell batteries were running low.

What to do?  We were weary of hotels, but surely many of them would be without power too, and the ones that were functioning were surely full.  We called our power company to report our problem and see how the repairs were coming, but the animated message could give no estimate of when electricity might be restored.   I got on my smart phone and learned that repairs could take not hours but days.   We resolved to just try to get some sleep in the sauna that was our room.  We sat out on the porch until it got dark.  Finally, we got sleepy and went inside.  To cooler air!  To the humming of the refrigerator!  The lights came on!

Our electricity was out for only about 24 hours, and we missed most of it.  We lost some food, but we had drawn our supplies down anyway for our two weeks of vacation, so that wasn’t so bad.  There are  about 600,000 people in the area–one out of three electricity company customers–who still don’t have power, so I both sympathize and empathize with them.

So now, despite our fun time in the woods, I now hail the electronic era as a great blessing and have learned not to take it for granted.

 

Power outages drag on in D.C. region; officials fuming at utility companies – The Washington Post.

Into the wilderness

Today we head out for a little cabin in the big woods.  We will have no internet connection, no cell phone reception, no cable television, and no newspapers.  If we survive, we will crawl out of the wilderness like Rip Van Winkle, if Rip Van Winkle only slept for five days.   Still, we have been looking forward to this for a long time.  That does mean that I won’t be doing any blogging for the rest of the week.

If we can avoid dying of exposure or getting eaten by wild animals, I’ll be back the first of July.  In the meantime, if something happens in the world that you think I would normally blog about–for example, if the Supremes rule on Obamacare–please make a comment to that effect here and discuss as you think appropriate.

If all goes well, I’ll be posting again on July 2.  By then I’ll probably be grateful again for the blessings of civilization, technology, and the information age.  In the meantime, I’ll enjoy being without them.

[Updated by tODD: Actually, at the risk of presuming on our good host’s hospitality, I’m going to create at least one new post for the discussion of the Supreme Court ruling in Arizona v. United States, as I assume that’s one topic we’ll want to discuss here, and it might keep discussion a bit tidier than having it all in one thread. And, come Thursday, I’ll set up another one specifically for the Supreme Court ruling on the health care law.

Feel free to discuss other matters here, or to propose topics we could discuss in separate posts this week. I’ll do my best to create posts on topics that seem of general interest. I know I’m often wrong about everything you hold dear, but I’ll try to be impartial here — at least, in the creation of discussion posts. I just don’t want us all trying to discuss everything in one thread for four days. I know how whiny you guys can get when you’re not getting your Cranach fix.]

A Heat wave stifles Oklahoma City Thunder

Well, the Oklahoma City Thunder made it to the NBA championship series but got beat 4 games to 1 by the Miami Heat.  But I refuse to take the blame.  I’ve been enjoying watching basketball again, and I think I’ll continue to do so.

The Thunder rolls

As I have confessed in this space, I have pretty much stopped watching basketball, due to the feeling that I always jinx the team I want to win.  Well, the Oklahoma City Thunder–from my home state–are so good that they even overcame me.

When they were down two games to the San Antonio Spurs, a team that had won 20 in a row, I thought I might as well watch them, since they were going to lose anyway.  Well, they didn’t.  They won.  I kept watching.  They won again.  Then won again.   Apparently my curse has been lifted because last night they won game 4–even though they were down 18 at one point in the game–winning the Western Conference and going to the NBA Finals.

The Thunder–Oklahoma’s first professional major-league team– is a good example of how a sports team can be good for a community and a whole state, sparking a sense of unity, confidence, and all kinds of civic virtues.

Thunder finish Spurs, advance to Finals – USATODAY.com.

A week without this blog

Hello.  Test. Test. Is this thing on?  I think so, now.  After a week!

So the hosting company’s server went down, but then they had trouble transferring the files to a new one, and then they gave me an alphabet soup of technical gibberish in an effort to help me understand what was happening.  . . .

Let’s see if this time the blog stays up for more than minutes at a time.  Try to get on several times during the course of the day and if you can, help spread the word that Cranach is back.

I do appreciate the numerous expressions of concern that I received from many of you.  Some suspected something sinister, that we were being blocked or hacked.  (As someone observed, that post about Islam and Mormonism surely offended both Democrats and Republicans!)  I’m pretty sure, though, that the only sinister force at work is with my hosting company.

I’ve put up a couple of posts, below, that I tried in vain to post all last week.  I don’t think they are too dated.  But we’ll get caught up.

I just hope you didn’t break your habit with this blog.  I hope I didn’t break my habit with this blog.  It was kind of nice not doing it.  I read.  Watched TV.  Went to bed early.  Went to a movie to see “The Avengers.”  But I realize that I need it.  It made surfing the web frustrating when I found something that I couldn’t tell you guys about.

Levon Helm

Levon Helm, the lead singer and drummer of the group so iconic that they just went by the name “The Band,” has died.  They were first known as Bob Dylan’s backup band, but they went off on their own and virtually invented the genre of Americana.  Their Music from Big Pink was one of my favorite albums back in the day.

Here is a fine tribute from an excellent website (the home of, shall we say, Lutheran Anglicans):  Catch a Cannonball (to Take Me on Down the Line): In Memory of Levon Helm | Mockingbird.

And here is Levon Helms singing a cut from Big Pink from 1969:


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