Unburden’d crawl toward death

’tis our fast intent

To shake all cares and business from our age,

Conferring them on younger strengths while we

Unburden’d crawl toward death.

(Shakespeare, King Lear, Act I. scene 1. lines 38-41)

Have any greater lines ever been written about retirement?  OK, it didn’t work out very well for King Lear.  I’m hoping that it will work out better for me.  Like Lear, I have two daughters that I hope to spend more time with.  I’m hoping they won’t turn me out into the storm, though I’ll be moving to a land of thunderstorms.  Unlike Lear, I have a wife who is good company and a whole passel of grandchildren.

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A book that teaches kids about church

My daughter, Dcs. Mary Moerbe, has published another children’s book:  Whisper, Whisper:  Learning about Church.  It teaches children, aged 4 and younger, what is going on in the worship service (with special reference to the liturgy) and helps them participate in it.

The book uses a rhyming text for the children and wonderful art by Martha Aviles, but it also has commentary and sidebars giving tips for parents.   You can “look inside” the book at the Amazon link.  More details after the jump.

This is a quite brilliant and helpful work, and I say that not just because it’s written by my daughter.  The tendency is often to kick children out of church–whether in a nursery or some kind of “children’s church”–and then we wonder why they don’t attend when they are older.  Our children are children of God, and they can learn to worship Him at a very young age, building habits and behaviors that will be a foundation for the rest of their lives. [Read more...]

Reviews of “Whisper, Whisper: Learning about Church”

What they are saying at Amazon about my daughter’s new book, Whisper, Whisper: Learning About Church, after the jump.

Let me put it this way.  If you can buy either mine or hers, buy hers.  It’s cheaper anyway. [Read more...]

My daughter’s new book: Teaching kids about church

Do you have little kids who squirm and whine and have no idea what is going on in church?  Then you need the new book by my daughter, Deaconness Mary Moerbe,  entitled Whisper, Whisper: Learning About Church.

It’s a children’s book, with wonderful illustrations by Martha Aviles and a charming rhyming text.  But it also includes suggestions in the margins for how parents can help their children take part in the Divine Service.

Hers came out the same day mine did, which makes me very proud.  More about her book after the jump. [Read more...]

Reviews of “Where Christ Is Present”

More shameless promotion of the new book I edited with John Warwick Montgomery, Where Christ Is Present.  (I am uncomfortable with promoting myself and my work, and you have to admit I don’t do it very often.  But I really like the essays in our collection and want people to read them.  Tell you what. . . .Buy the book, but don’t read my essay.  Just read the others.  OK, I feel better now and will now promote the book without inhibition.)

After the jump, what people are saying about the book on Amazon.  The reviews give you a good idea of what the different essays are about. [Read more...]

What’s in our new book?

The book I put together with John Warwick Montgomery, Where Christ Is Present, consists of some brilliant essays on different aspects of Lutheran teaching and practice.  As the Amazon reviews are saying of particular essays, each one is worth the price of the book.  And they aren’t just rehashing of old arguments and stale polemics.  They bring something new to the discussions and present the concept in fresh ways.

Some of them actually break new ground, or present things that I, at least, had never known before.  For example, Adam Francisco’s chapter on the Scriptures shows how the Early Church affirmed the Bible as its sole authority; later, it developed the concept of “tradition,” while insisting that the tradition is consistent with and normed by the Bible; later, though, some theologians started to teach that tradition is, in effect, above the Bible; not till fairly late in the Middle Ages was the Papacy elevated as a superior authority to both the Bible and tradition.  I never knew that.

I also learned a great deal from Angus Menuge about the influence of Lutheranism on science; Craig Parton on Christian liberty and how that is manifested in the work of the great Lutheran artist Johann Sebastian Bach; Steve Hein on the nature of the Christian life; and. . . well, all of them really.  After the jump is the Table of Contents, giving the list of chapters and their authors.

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