Is democracy for everybody?

American political theory tends to believe that democracy is based on universal human values and is the right form of government for everyone.  But, as columnist Richard Cohen says, after rehearsing the fiascos of “the Arab Spring” and other seemingly democratic movements that ended in even more despotism, “For the United States, trying to spread democracy is like love for a teenager — it has gotten us into no end of trouble.” [Read more...]

Christianity’s relationship of opposition

The Orthodox Rod Dreher, who quoted Bonhoeffer in an essay on Christians separating themselves from the world, quotes another Lutheran, Søren Kierkegaard.  In his Attack upon “Christendom”, his devastating critique of the Danish state church and “cultural Christianity,” Kierkegaard argues that inherent to the faith is “a relationship of opposition” to the world.  He also makes the point that the final apostasy will not be when everybody renounces Christianity but when everybody claims to be a Christian. [Read more...]

The Third Form of Atheism

In responding to a Contemporary Christian musician who came out as gay, saying that she is convinced that God accepts her just as she is, Robert George draws on Plato, who said that there are  three forms of atheism:

(1) Not believing that God or the gods exist.

(2) Believing there is a God, but he is not concerned with human affairs.

(3)  Believing that there is a God who is concerned with human affairs, but he is “soft-spirited,” making no demands.

Dr. George believes that the third form of atheism is the greatest threat to Christianity and our civilization today. [Read more...]

Are freedom and democracy obsolete?

The Prime Minister of Hungary has said what many people around the world have been thinking:  That freedom and democracy are obsolete.  With today’s complex economic and social problems, the democratic process is always checking and balancing itself, making it just too slow and polarizing, as evidenced by the political paralysis in the United States.  The most successful models that nations should be emulating, he says, are the authoritarian systems of Russia, China, Turkey, and Singapore. [Read more...]

The political roots of atheism

Atheists are always invoking science, but notice how often their arguments and rhetoric use political language.  God allegedly “oppresses” human beings, taking away their “freedom.”  They say that God is “immoral,” that, in the words of John Lennon, if we imagine no religion, “the world would live as one.”

In fact, as Nick Spencer shows in Politico, the origins of atheism in the West had little to do with the rise of science; rather, it grew out of radical political movements.  Marxism, of course, but before that the mindset of the French revolutionaries, with their anti-clericalism and opposition to the Catholicism that was allied to the old royal order.  Many of these revolutionaries were Deists, but others took the next step of atheism.   There were, however, some countries–such as the United States–in which the church did not oppose the new “liberal” ideas, so that atheism had little traction.   After the jump, a link to Mr. Spencer’s article and an extract. [Read more...]

A Christian case against Natural Law

As we posted earlier, many Christians are approaching moral issues in terms of natural law philosophy in an attempt to make a case before the secular world.  But Orthodoxy theologian David Bentley Hart argues that this is futile, that divine revelation is necessary for any kind of moral clarity.  Read the pro- and the con- argument (after the jump).  Which one do you think makes the better case? [Read more...]


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