The Obamacare confession

When I heard about the Obama operative who said that the passage of Obamacare was helped by Americans’ “stupidity,” I assumed it was just a gaffe, with which Republicans could play “gotcha.”  But it turns out, the comment was in the context of a frank explanation in front of a friendly liberal audience at MIT about how the administration got Obamacare through Congress.

And the operative’s other comments are even more damaging to the bill.  A second video supports the opponents’ of the law’s case before the Supreme Court by indicating that the language restricting subsidies to state exchanges was intentional. [Read more…]

Election post-mortem

Democrats thought they had demographics, the young adult vote, the Hispanic vote, the women’s vote, and the cultural tides all going for them.  And yet, they lost catastrophically.  So what went wrong?  After the jump, excerpts and some links to attempts to account for what happened. [Read more…]

Election results

I now know a Senator–Ben Sasse won in Nebraska!  The biggest surprise so far is in my home state of Virginia, where Republican Ed Gillespie–who no one thought had a chance–is leading incumbent Democrat Mark Warner, though the election is too close to call as of this moment.  Right now, 10:00 p.m., the Republicans are up 5 (beating Democratic incumbents in West Virginia, Arkansas, Montana, South Dakota, and Colorado), needing 6 to win the Senate majority, though that net gain could go down if they lose any incumbent seats.  The Republicans have retained the House of Representatives, picking up 10 seats.

My custom has been to stay up to watch election returns, but it’s an hour later than the clock says, due to the recent daylight savings time shift that I haven’t adjusted to yet, and I’m  getting sleepy.  It’s 10:39.  I’m going to bed.

But you can learn the results of all the races, which should be announced by daylight,  here:  Politics, Political News – POLITICO.com.

So what do these results mean?

Election Day

Today we Americans are privileged to participate in what has been called the “civic sacrament” of voting.

Elections for public office are not new, of course.  They were staples of the Greek democracy and the Roman republic.  The papacy has always been an elected position.  In medieval Europe, the Emperor was elected, the main difference from our elections being that only seven people got to vote (including the Duke of Saxony, which is why one holder of that office, Frederick the Wise, had the clout to prevent Martin Luther from being burned at the stake).

Pundits expect a big day for Republicans, who may well gain a majority on the Senate.   Any predictions? [Read more…]

Pastors defying the IRS by politicking from the pulpit

More and more pastors are endorsing particular candidates from the pulpit, purposefully defying the IRS law for non-profit tax-exempt organizations.  So far the IRS is ignoring the violations, but the pastors are goading the agency by sending it tapes of their sermons.

Is this a violation of Romans 13?  Also, under Romans 13, shouldn’t churches just pay taxes, thus preserving their ability to preach whatever they want?  Or can you make a case for this kind of civil disobedience?  There is also, of course, the theological issue of what is supposed to be preached from the pulpit–namely, Christ and Him crucified for sinners, as opposed to worldly powers and principalities.  Or can you give a theological reason for preaching about political candidates? [Read more…]

Reaching pro-life Democrat women

For all of the Democratic campaign rhetoric accusing pro-lifers of conducting a “war on women,” it turns out that 29% of Democrats are pro-life.  Now the antiabortion Susan B. Anthony List is doing some creative campaigning to enlist pro-life Democrat women to persuade them to vote their convictions. [Read more…]