A scholarly study of anti-Christian bigotry

Sociologist George Yancey has conducted a study of people who are bigoted against Christianity.  He has found that conservative Christians share at least one thing with atheists:  both are hated by large numbers of people.  (Half of the public hate atheists, but a third hate conservative Christians.)   Prof. Yancey has found that “Christianophobia” is similar to bigotry against racial and ethnic groups and is found  largely among affluent white people.

Prof. Yancey tells about his study after the jump, which includes a link to his book on the subject, So Many Christians, So Few Lions:  Is There Christianophobia in the United States? [Read more...]

Family, country, God–in that order

The Barna pollsters have released a study of what factors tie into Americans’ self-identity.  The biggest factor by far is  “family.”  Then comes “country.”  Then comes religion.  Other elements, such as career and ethnicity, play a lesser but still significant role.  The mix is different according to different demographics.  After the jump, an excerpt and a link to the report, for more details. [Read more...]

Male abortions & the end of “women’s issues”?

Feminism and gender politics in general may be coming apart, since gender  identity is being parsed into ever-smaller mutually offended units.  To so much as speak of “women’s issues” is now considered in some of these circles to be oppressive to transexuals, an act of “cissexism,” defined as “transphobia.”  To the point that some pro-abortion groups are eliminating references to women, since non-women (such as transexuals who used to be women but now identify as men, as well as “gender queer people” and “two spirit people”) also can have abortions.  So explains Katherine Timpf, after the jump. [Read more...]

Raising little narcissists

A study purports to show how certain parenting styles can turn children into narcissists.  But it distinguishes between narcissism, which is bad, and “self-esteem,” which is good. [Read more...]

From justifying God to justifying existence

More (see my last post on the subject) from Living by Faith by Oswald Bayer. . .

Not only are we always judging, condemning/justifying ourselves and each other, we also judge, condemn/justify God.  Bayer has some interesting reflections on “theodicy,” the question of how or why God allows evil,  drawing on sources that I wasn’t familiar with.  But what most struck me was Bayer’s observation that when the idea of God fades away in some people’s minds, the problem of theodicy remains.  He describes a “secular theodicy.”  No longer, “why does God allow evil and suffering,” but “why does existence allow evil and suffering.”  In many ways, that latter question is harder to answer.  I am seeing that this is why so many people today believe that life is meaningless, absurd, pointless, and (in a tragic number of cases) not worth living.

I’m thinking that, as I read on, Bayer will show that justification by Christ on the Cross justifies God (in this sense) and justifies existence itself.

[Read more...]

Justifying ourselves

I am reading a book that is blowing me away:  Living by Faith by Oswald Bayer, the contemporary German theologian who is sort of the Lutheran answer to radical orthodoxy.  Instead of reading it all, then writing a formal review, I am so excited by this book that I thought I would write posts about what I am finding so interesting as I am reading through it.

Bayer begins by showing that the concept of “justification” is not an arcane theological concept.  Rather, it’s something we are preoccupied with all the time.  We are always engaged in trying to justify ourselves.  We are always maintaining that we are right, particularly when other people say that we are wrong.  At work, in our casual conversations, in our relationships with others, we are always defending ourselves, making excuses, scoring points, and seeking approval.  I mean, you see it in the comments on this and other blogs. [Read more...]


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