Now that men can become pregnant. . .

A_TransGender-Symbol_Plain2Now that gender has been disassociated from biology and is a matter of personal self-identification, a man can become pregnant.  (That is, someone born with female organs but who self-identifies as a man has to be considered as a man.  If “he” hasn’t had sex-reassignment surgery and has sex with a biological man–I suppose we would have to call “him” gay–then “he” could have a baby.)

Carl Trueman studies a military manual instructing officers how to handle transgender issues, including a male soldier who gets pregnant.

So the body is thought to have nothing to do with gender, with sex, with parenting, with personal identity.  Now Gnosticism has become our new civil religion.

[Read more…]

Unhinged over-reactions to the election

My daughter told me about someone coming up to her after Donald Trump’s election as if to comfort her, saying how she would be “safe” here in Australia.

It’s a common theme I’m seeing on TV interviews, social media, and in the liberal press:  “I am so frightened.”  Columns on how to calm your children’s fears of Donald Trump.  Videos of Clinton supporters weeping and pouting.  “It’s worse than 9/11!”   [Read more…]

The older you get, the happier you are?

A study has found a linear relationship between old age and happiness. That is, the older you get, the happier you are.

Despite the deterioration of the body and the whole array of health and mental problems as people age, happiness increases.  The linear relationship means that people in their 90s are happier than they were in their 80s, and in their 70s than in their 60s, etc.  The biggest miseries are in young adulthood, the supposed prime of life.

I can relate to this.  Consider the stress involved in trying to find someone to marry, in trying to find a job, in raising children, in trying to find success in one’s career.  Older people are on the other side of all that.

But the continual growth in happiness in the post-retirement decades, that’s a mystery, and no doubt a gift.

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Are Christians the powerful or the marginalized?

In the course of a post on why so many evangelicals are supporting Donald Trump, S. D. Kelly tosses off an observation that explains much about the current controversies between Christians and secularists.

Secularists tend to see Christians as “the powerful”; that is, in postmodern parlance, those who are in a position of power and privilege who oppress “the marginalized,” those who lack power and privilege.

But Christians tend to see themselves as “the marginalized,” oppressed by the cultural elite who exclude them and exercise their power against them.

Thus, when a Christian baker refuses to participate in a gay wedding, the secularists see the Christian heteronormative establishment discriminating against marginalized and oppressed gay people.

While Christians see secularists–who control the culture, the entertainment industry, the educational establishment, the government, and the law–imposing their sexual ideology on those with traditional Christian values and punishing them for their minority religious beliefs.

This explains much of the rhetoric, argumentation, and high feelings on both sides.  Are these just two irreconcilable perceptions?  Or can we make an objective case for one side or the other?  Does realizing these different perceptions suggest other ways of addressing these controversies? [Read more…]

Exorcism as pastoral care

I came across a long, detailed account of an evangelical pastor who casts out demons.  Not with a rite of exorcism or a laying on of hands, but with a “conversation” in the context of what sounds like ordinary pastoral care.

The pastor, Rev. Karl Payne, has written a book about his experiences and his approach.

Please read the article–excerpted and linked after the jump–and tell me what you think of it.  Have any of you pastors experienced anything similar?   [Read more…]

Young men living the dream

Research shows that young men 18-30 are more likely to be living with their parents than with a woman.  And that the large number of the unemployed in this demographic are not only living with their parents but spending virtually all of the time they would normally be working playing video games.

But here is the kicker:  They LIKE living this way.  It isn’t that poor economic prospects are causing them to retreat into a depressing isolation.  They consider this a good life.  Expending their sexual impulses in internet pornography, rather than marriage or dating that could lead to marriage, and channeling all of their aggression into first person shooters, instead of the military or ambition or earning a living or protecting a family, this generation is happy, content, and living the dream.

So says Samuel D. James, drawing on the research of Erik Hurst and the insights of Russell Moore, excerpted and linked after the jump.

[Read more…]