Sex as sacrament, abortion as religious ritual

More from Mary Eberstadt and her new book, discussing how sex is the sacrament for the new religion and abortion is its sacred ritual.  She  also notes how if abortion proponents were truly “pro-choice,” there would be times for abortion’s  defenders to choose against it, but this never happens.  She also observes that people aren’t losing their jobs for self-publishing books against, say, stealing.  No one gets in trouble for citing the Book of Ruth.  Rather, virtually all of the opposition to Christianity and to religious liberty today derives from Christianity’s opposition to the sexual revolution.

[Read more…]

Secular progressivism as church

Secular progressivism has assumed the form of an institutionalized religion, complete with orthodox dogmas that may not be questioned, saints and demons, sacraments and rituals.  It has become a church–not the beneficent kind, but the sort that squelches liberty and seeks to punish non-believers.

So argues Mary Eberstadt in a book on the subject and in an article excerpted after the jump. [Read more…]

Islamic exceptionalism

We keep hearing, “All religions are essentially the same.”  But no they aren’t!  That sentiment is particularly unhelpful when trying to understand the different religions.  So it’s refreshing to read a Muslim scholar explaining, in Time Magazine, no less, How Islam Is Different From Other Religions.

Shadi Hamid, the author of Islamic Exceptionalism, shows how and why Islam ties together religion and government and is so resistant to secularism. [Read more…]

Britain now has more “nones” than Christians

Great Britain now has more people who say they have “no religion” (48%) than say they are Christians (44%).  (Other religions such as Islam constitute 8%.)  And this happened fast.  Fifteen years ago, around 75% said they were Christians.  Five years ago, only 25% said they have “no religion.”  After the jump, a story about this from the London Spectator.

For a long time, most Brits still considered themselves Christians, while hardly ever attending services.  Staying Christian requires going to church.  Then again, when the churches themselves, as a whole, become so theologically liberal they stop teaching anything that could be recognized as Christianity, then of course Christianity will, apart from divine intervention, be extinguished.

Could such a religious shift happen in the USA?  Or is it already happening? [Read more…]

Those religious-extremist Anglicans

Yes, American foreign policy is a laughing-stock abroad, but that means at least some of the reaction is funny.  British commentator Douglas Murray discusses the new American counter-terrorism strategy, which, in its written form, never mentions “Islam.”  Terrorist-inspiring religious extremism is a problem, says Secretary of State John Kerry, for all religions.  Which has Mr. Murray worried about what’s going on with those Anglicans. [Read more…]

Was Christopher Hitchens reconsidering his atheism?

Christopher Hitchens was one of the most prominent of the “new atheists,” but a book by evangelical author Larry Alex Taunton who travelled with him says that after his diagnosis of terminal cancer, which killed him in 2011, he was reconsidering his atheism and may have come close to converting to Christianity.  And that there is the unlikely possibility that, on his deathbed, he did.

Taunton studied the Bible with Hitchens, who talked about his “divided self.”

A sympathetic review in the New York Times after the jump, which also cites deathbed conversions that I didn’t know about (Wallace Stevens, Buffalo Bill Cody, John Wayne, et al.).

[Read more…]


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