A baby’s sense of morality

Research is showing that babies as young as six months have a moral sense.  Some ingenious experiments with toys show babies favoring “good guys” over “bad guys.”  And they really like to see “bad guys” punished.   This suggests that morality is not just learned from the culture but that it has elements that are innate–that is, “written on the heart.”   Details after the jump. [Read more...]

“A strangeness at the heart of all things”

Michael Gerson says that we are in the “golden age of physics,” which explodes the old common sense materialism and discloses “a strangeness at the heart of all things.”

He gives examples of the weird science that quantum physics reveals, then speculates about the philosophical questions.  Read the excerpts after the break and consider:  What are the worldview implications of the new physics? [Read more...]

The myth of ‘settled science’

Charles Krauthhammer says there is no such thing as “settled science”:

“The debate is settled,” asserted propagandist in chief Barack Obama in his latest State of the Union address. “Climate change is a fact.” Really? There is nothing more anti-scientific than the very idea that science is settled, static, impervious to challenge. [Read more...]

Abortion and 19th century science

Great comment on the Justice halts birth control mandate post from Kerner:

The majority opinion of Roe vs. Wade balances the “right to privacy” of the mother against the “potential human life” of the unborn child. Basically, a small group of men who were born in the 19th century, applied 19th century knowledge about biology, genetics and obstetrics to determine that a human fetus was not really human and therefore not entitled to Constitutional protection. By considering this as purely a women’s rights issue, we ended up with Roe vs. Wade. . . . [Read more...]

The NSA’s encryption-busting quantum computer

The NSA is working on the development of a quantum computer that could foil all public encryption systems.  The description of this technology, after the jump, combines weird physics, weird mathematics, and weird surveillance. [Read more...]

Reading a novel is good for your brain

The kind of research that we literature professors appreciate:

Being pulled into the world of a gripping novel can trigger actual, measurable changes in the brain that linger for at least five days after reading, scientists have said. [Read more...]


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