Hollywood, desire, & the Santa Barbara murders

Washington Post critic Ann Hornaday on the Santa Barbara murders:

As deranged manifestos go, the final YouTube video made by suspected Isla Vista, Calif., mass murderer Elliot Rodger was remarkably well-made. Filmed by Rodger in his black BMW, with palm trees in the background and his face bathed in magic-hour key light, the six-minute diatribe — during which he vows revenge on all the women who rejected him and men who were enjoying fun and sex while he was “rotting in loneliness” — might easily have been mistaken for a scene from one of the movies Rodger’s father, Peter Rodger, worked on as a director and cinematographer. [Read more...]

Pope calls conclave to re-examine sexual teachings

At this rate, maybe Pope Francis will be the last pope!

Contraception, cohabitation, divorce, remarriage and same-sex unions: They’re issues that pain and puzzle Roman Catholics who want to be true to both their church and themselves.

Now those issues are about to be put up for debate by their leader, a man who appears determined to push boundaries and effect change.

On Pope Francis’ orders, the Vatican will convene an urgent meeting of senior clerics this fall to reexamine church teachings that touch the most intimate aspects of people’s lives. Billed as an “extraordinary” assembly of bishops, the gathering could herald a new approach by the church to the sensitive topics. [Read more...]

“Coming out” as a Christian

In her memoir Dancing Through It, ballerina Jenifer Ringer tells about her Christian faith.  I was struck by this line from Washington Post reviewer Rebecca Ritzel:  “Coming out in a dance memoir as an evangelical Christian is nearly as rare as coming out as gay in the NFL.”

Back in 2012, we posted about the apotheosis of homosexuality and the demonization of Christians, asking whether Christians might someday become “the new gays.”  That is, whether being a Christian might be seen as socially shameful as homosexuality once was, that Christians would become “closeted,” keeping their faith secret from the public, except for those brave enough to “come out.”

Now we have a major media outlet using that kind of language for Christians.  Some will say, “That’s justice!  Now you Christians will know how it feels.”  Maybe so.  I can imagine the comments:  “They should not be allowed to get married!”  Certainly there is still stigma against homosexuality among the masses, if not in the media and elite circles.  I am not saying that Christians are treated worse than gays, which is obviously not true (nor am I saying those are  mutually exclusive categories), and I don’t want Christians to develop a persecution complex.  I am just wondering if we Christians are ready for the possibility of there someday being a severe  social stigma against our faith.  [Read more...]

World Vision takes back plan to hire married gays

The evangelical disaster relief organization World Vision created a stir with its announcement that it would hire homosexuals as long as they are married.  This would preserve the Christian principle of “no sex outside of marriage.”  But World Vision then reversed that decision, going back to its former policy requiring abstinence except for men and women married to each other. [Read more...]

How Fred Phelps helped the gay-rights movement

The late Fred Phelps with his Westboro Baptist Church, who picketed funerals of soldiers killed in action and proclaimed “God hates fags,” created such a negative impression of Christians who disapprove of homosexuality that he actually played a major role in advancing the cause of gay rights.  So say a number of gay activists and other observers. [Read more...]

J.R.R. Tolkien on Sex

In 1941, J. R. R. Tolkien did what most fathers tremble to do:  talk to his son about sex.  He did so in a letter filled with wisdom, insight, and a thoroughly Christian sensibility on what he called the devil’s “favorite subject.”  Suggestion to trembling fathers:  get The Letters of J. R.  R. Tolkien and show this particular  letter to your sons.  Al Mohler quotes from the letter and discusses what he had to say. [Read more...]


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