Psychology experiments often can’t be replicated

There is currently what is being described as a “crisis” in the field of social/personality psychology.  It turns out, many psychological experiments, however heralded in the media and whose findings are made a big deal of, cannot be replicated by other researchers.  Is that due to fraud?  Statistical quirks? Or does it mean that psychology is not a science after all? [Read more...]

The biggest factor in a child’s educational success

A British study has found that the biggest factor in a child’s educational success is the level of the father’s education.  That is, if the father is well-educated, his children are likely to do well in school.  And the father’s lack of education also manifests itself in his children not doing well.  The mother’s education is a factor, but not nearly as much as the father’s.

Is this just another example of a study proving what is self-evident and obvious?  So that fathers who value education make their kids study?  Or is there more to this correlation?

[Read more...]

Should Christianity try to be “cool”?

Brett McCracken, author of Hipster Christianity,  argues that there are intrinsic contradictions inherent in the various attempts to make Christianity “cool.”  See what he says after the jump, whereupon I offer some thoughts on my own on the efforts to adapt Christianity to one culture or another and offer a modest proposal. [Read more...]

Do kids raised by same-sex couples really fare better?

The media has been trumpeting an Australian study that purported to show that children raised by same-sex parents actually fare better than those raised in traditional families.  That’s quite a claim.  Until you look more closely at the study. [Read more...]

Effects of churches that teach vocation?

A Baylor study has found that people who attend churches that teach God’s presence in the workplace and the like have better job satisfaction, higher commitment to their work, and a stronger entrepreneurial spirit.  But is this really what the doctrine of vocation is all about? [Read more...]

Divorce statistics are greatly exaggerated

It’s often said that 50% of marriages end in divorce.  A new book says that the real number is between 20% and 25%.  For churchgoers, the rate is somewhere in the single digits or teens.

The author of The Good News about Marriage, Shaunti Feldhahn, says that hopelessness–which is nurtured by the discouraging but wrong statistics about marriage–is itself a major reason for divorce.  Actually, the institution of marriage is not in as bad a shape as people assume it is. [Read more...]


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