The winner of the Cranach NCAA pool. . .

. . .is Pete, who predicted three of the final four.  His strategy after the jump.  [Read more...]

The Cranach NCAA pool

There is probably a way to set up an online pool for your NCAA basketball tournament predictions, complete with interactive brackets and monetary awards, but that goes beyond the scope of our Patheos software.  So let’s just keep it simple:  Give your projections for the Final Four, the top two, and the national champion.

BONUS:  There always seems to be a surprise “Cinderella” team, some little school that comes out of nowhere to break into the Sweet Sixteen or otherwise do better than anyone would have expected.  Will that happen again this year, and, if so, who will it be?

The person with the best predictions will win not money but blog glory and bragging rights. [Read more...]

Does God determine who wins the Super Bowl?

Last year a respected research institute found that 50% of sports fans believe supernatural forces are at work in sporting events.  That includes 19% who believes that God determines the outcome, 26% who pray for their team to win, and 25% who believe their team has been cursed.  More recently it’s been reported that 25% of Americans believe that God will determine who wins the Super Bowl.  (See this.)

Now the obvious response is to be indignant and say that’s ridiculous.  God doesn’t care about such trivialities as who wins a football game.  But wait a minute.  If God cares about the fall of a sparrow, why wouldn’t he care about the fall of a wide receiver?  If God’s providence extends to all of reality, why wouldn’t that include football games?

So what do you think about this?  Apply actual theology in answering this question one way or the other.

[Read more...]

Why do the winners riot?

Ohio State beat Oregon to win the collegiate football championship, the first one under the new playoff system.

Question:  Why in America do fans of the winners of big games riot, setting fires, breaking things, threatening cops?  In other countries, sports violence is a problem, but my impression is that it’s usually losers and fans who feel cheated who start tearing up things.

To switch to the NFL, I don’t think Detroit fans rioted when the penalty flags against Dallas were picked up, and no one rioted in Dallas when an apparent catch was ruled incomplete in the game won by Green Bay [hooray!].  And there were no riots in Oregon.  But the victorious Ohio State fans felt so happy that they set 89 fires. [Read more...]

The future of sports

In Europe and Asia, thousands of spectators are rooting for their favorite well-paid players, listening to color commentary, and filling arenas to watch people playing video games.

The time may come when, instead of watching professionals play in the NFL, we will watch professionals play Madden NFL. [Read more...]

On the NBA championship

For the first time, I actually followed the NBA this season.  That was due to my Oklahoma nationalism–that being where I grew up–and getting hooked on the Oklahoma City Thunder, with MVP Kevin Durant and company.

I had always thought the playoffs, which involve a best-of-seven series on every level with days between games, lasted forever.  But now that I had a horse in this race, I found myself drawn in, as the Thunder advanced two levels–each filled with drama, soap-opera intrigue, and thrilling games–until they were beaten by the San Antonio Spurs.  That team just won the championship by decisively beating Lebron James and his superstar team the Miami Heat.  Watching the Thunder play the Spurs for so many games made me appreciate them, and I’m glad they won. [Read more...]


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