Two ways towards Net Neutrality

President Obama has embraced the principle of “net neutrality,” meaning that internet providers shouldn’t charge some big-content providers more than others.  Towards that end, the President wants to regulate the internet like any other utility.  As opposed to just tailoring a specific and limited regulation dealing with the issue.  He wants to take over the whole online universe, using a public-utility law written in 1934. [Read more...]

Landing on a comet

A probe from the European Space Agency landed on a comet, an object just two and half miles wide, 300 million miles away.  That’s quite a feat of engineering.

The Philae lander beamed back images showing one of its three feet on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko . This photo is compiled from two images; a wider version will be released later Thursday.

[Read more...]

Tappett brother dies

I have a thesis that anything can be made interesting, if it is just presented in the right way.  I’m not all that interested in cars, but I love Car Talk, NPR’s auto repair call in show, in which “Click and Clack, the Tappett Brothers” solve mechanical mysteries in a most hilarious and interesting way.

One of the brothers, Tom Magliozzi, died on Monday of Alzheimer’s disease.  Car Talk stopped its live programming in 2012, but the re-runs may go on forever, or at least until the internal combustion engine fades away. [Read more...]

Flying cars

As someone who grew up on the Jetsons, I have been disillusioned that the we did not get a lot of the things Walt Disney’s Tomorrowland promised us “by the year 2000.”  Yes, we have moving sidewalks, but they are humdrum people movers at the airport, rather than soaring avenues in the sky.  Yes, we have computers, the internet, and GPS systems that go beyond the wildest fantasies of 1950′s futurists, but where are the flying cars?  Actually, right now a company has one on sale.  Details and videos after the jump. [Read more...]

1,000 Bible translations on your phone

In church, when you seem people staring at their smart phones, they aren’t necessarily texting, surfing, or playing games.  They may well be using their Bible apps, allowing them to read the Scriptures and follow along with the text of a sermon on their mobile devices.  They can also switch translations so that they can use the one the pastor is using.  The one I use, YouVersion, gives me access to 41 Bible translations in English.  But YouVersion also allows you and people around the world to access the Bible in other languages–over a thousand of them.  The app, which is free, now offers the Bible in (at last count, a few minutes ago when I checked) 1,030 languages.

You can download the app here or at your phone’s app store.  See details about YouVersion’s achievement after the jump, including which languages are most popular and what percentage of the world’s languages this covers. Do any of you have other Bible or devotional apps that you would recommend? [Read more...]

Cell phones the police can’t tap into

You can set up a passcode to protect the information on your cell phone.  But the manufacturers can still unlock that information if given a court order, giving police and other government agencies access to people’s private data.  But Apple has announced that the new operating system for iPhones, iOS 8, will not give the company access to passcode-protected phones, making it technologically impossible to comply with snooping requests.  Android is following suit.

What do you think of this?  Is it a commendable blow for personal privacy against government surveillance?  Or is it an abdication of responsibility to help authorities fight crime?

[Read more...]


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