Reviews of “Where Christ Is Present”

More shameless promotion of the new book I edited with John Warwick Montgomery, Where Christ Is Present.  (I am uncomfortable with promoting myself and my work, and you have to admit I don’t do it very often.  But I really like the essays in our collection and want people to read them.  Tell you what. . . .Buy the book, but don’t read my essay.  Just read the others.  OK, I feel better now and will now promote the book without inhibition.)

After the jump, what people are saying about the book on Amazon.  The reviews give you a good idea of what the different essays are about. [Read more...]

What’s in our new book?

The book I put together with John Warwick Montgomery, Where Christ Is Present, consists of some brilliant essays on different aspects of Lutheran teaching and practice.  As the Amazon reviews are saying of particular essays, each one is worth the price of the book.  And they aren’t just rehashing of old arguments and stale polemics.  They bring something new to the discussions and present the concept in fresh ways.

Some of them actually break new ground, or present things that I, at least, had never known before.  For example, Adam Francisco’s chapter on the Scriptures shows how the Early Church affirmed the Bible as its sole authority; later, it developed the concept of “tradition,” while insisting that the tradition is consistent with and normed by the Bible; later, though, some theologians started to teach that tradition is, in effect, above the Bible; not till fairly late in the Middle Ages was the Papacy elevated as a superior authority to both the Bible and tradition.  I never knew that.

I also learned a great deal from Angus Menuge about the influence of Lutheranism on science; Craig Parton on Christian liberty and how that is manifested in the work of the great Lutheran artist Johann Sebastian Bach; Steve Hein on the nature of the Christian life; and. . . well, all of them really.  After the jump is the Table of Contents, giving the list of chapters and their authors.

[Read more...]

Our new book: Where Christ Is Present

I have collaborated with John Warwick Montgomery in editing and contributing to a new book that has just come out:  Where Christ Is Present: A Theology for All Seasons on the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation.

It’s a collection of essays that constitute an apologetic for Lutheranism, making the case that Lutheran theology and practice is uniquely relevant to our times.  One of its purposes is to help people looking for a church home, particularly evangelicals who are frustrated with their own tradition, to the point of considering Catholicism, Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, or something else.  We want them to check out Lutheranism.

The book consists of chapters by A. S. Francisco, Rod Rosenbladt, Harold Senkbeil, Todd Wilken, Uwe Siemon-Netto, Craig A. Parton, Steven A. Hein, Angus J. L. Menuge, and Cameron A. MacKenzie, in addition to Dr. Montgomery and me.  After the jump, the description on Amazon.  I’ll be talking more about the book over the course of the week. [Read more...]

The Pope’s preacher says Luther was right

British religion reporter Christopher Howse tells about a sermon from Pope Benedict XVI ‘s preacher, Fr. Raniero Cantalamesa, that basically concedes that Luther was right on justification.  Well, sort of.

This was in the context of the Joint Declaration on Justification between the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran World Federation.  We confessional Lutherans deny that this accord was a true agreement, but this sermon–published in the book Remember Jesus Christ–faults Catholics for neglecting justification.  Howse’s discussion, however, also shows the differences that remain.

[Read more...]

Imaginary Yelp reviews from famous theologians

What might Martin Luther, John Calvin, John Wesley, Charles Spurgeon, Charles Finney, Billy Graham, John Chrysostom, Tim Keller, and the Apostle Paul say about Joel Osteen’s church, with its Prosperity Gospel and Power of Positive Thinking?

Anthony Sacramone has the spiritual gift of being able to give spot-on madcap imitations of famous preachers and theologians.  See what he does in imagining Yelp reviews of Rev. Osteen’s church from those distinguished figures. [Read more...]

Calling God a woman

Now that the Church of England has ordained its first female bishops, it is considering changing the Book of Common Prayer and catechetical materials to refer to God as “she” and as “mother.”  (This will probably be in formulations like “father and mother” as some liberal churches are already doing.)

Here is a good response to this effort from a Roman Catholic perspective:  Fr. Dwight Longenecker, Twelve Reasons Why You Can’t Call God “Mother.” [Read more...]


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