The vocation of a teenager

Vocation is in the here and now, and it’s something all Christians have.  It doesn’t mean just “job” but refers to the arenas God brings us to for love and service to our neighbor.  So teenagers aren’t just preparing for a vocation in the future; rather, they can love and serve now.

Scott Keith, at the Jagged Word (a multi-author blog you should keep up with, affiliated with 1517: The Legacy Project), has written a great piece about his daughter Autumn and her service (to which I have a personal connection), along with misunderstandings people have about a teenager’s vocation. [Read more...]

Can you be pro-life and pro-gun?

Evangelical pastor Rob Schenck criticizes his fellow conservative Christians for being knee-jerk 2nd Amendment supporters, arguing that it is impossible to be both pro-life and pro-gun.  A Lutheran police officer, Joseph Klotz, answers those arguments, concluding that the missing piece of the puzzle is vocation. [Read more...]

Gordon Lightfoot’s vocation

The London Telegraph interviewed songwriter Gordon Lightfoot, who reflected on his life and career.  We can see how the most seemingly ordinary things–parents, church, small-town life, listening to Bing Crosby Christmas records–turned him into the artist that he became.  The interview reads like a meditation on vocation. [Read more...]

The vocation of being an advocate for the dead

An article on the real-life doctor featured in the movie Concussion says quite a bit about the Nigerian Christian’s understanding of “calling”; that is, vocation.  (Did any of this come out in the movie?) [Read more...]

Donald Trump as an evangelical

Donald Trump is calling himself an “evangelical.”  Christian columnist Michael Gerson discusses that self-identification, in the course of which he tells a great anecdote relating to (a misunderstanding of) vocation. [Read more...]

Christmas and Vocation

One thing you learn from the doctrine of vocation is that the Christian life includes what we might describe as the secular.  The realm of “Christian” does not consist just of overtly devout exercises.  Rather, it also includes our lives in the family, the workplace, and the community.  This point also applies to how we celebrate Christmas.  We are surely right to complain when Jesus is left out of the celebration of His birthday, but those who complain about the secular observances–wanting it to be just a religious holiday celebrated in church, being irked that even non-Christians are celebrating it, and complaining about all of the presents–may be missing something about the scope of Christ’s reign and the nature of vocation. [Read more...]


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