The last dough-boy

The last American veteran of World War I died at the age of 110.  Frank Buckles enlisted in 1917, lying about his age, which was only 16.  After that war, he worked in the civilian merchant marine. When World War II broke out, he was captured by the Japanese and spent over three years in a P.O.W. camp in the Philippines.

Two others who served in World War I are still alive, a 109-year-old man from Australia and a 110-year-old woman from Great Britain.

Mr. Buckles, who lived in West Virginia, sounds like he was a really likeable guy.  Read his profile: Last U.S. World War I veteran Frank W. Buckles dies at 110.

You be the judge

Two Supreme Court cases. . . .

(1)  A man was shot.  Just before he died, he said, “Rick shot me.”  So Rick was arrested.  The problem is, the Constitution requires that the accused be able to face the witnesses against him so they can face cross-examination.  In this case, the witness–who was also the victim–is dead.  Therefore, according to the Michigan Supreme Court, the victim’s dying words identifying his killer are not admissible in a court of law.

The Supreme Court overturned that ruling, 6-2.  Rick will have to pay for his crime, on the testimony of his victim.  Justice Antonin Scalia, a Constitutional originalist, wrote a bitter dissent.  In this case, the court favored what might be called common sense over and against the literal reading of the Constitution.

Court: Victim’s dying words may be used at trial.

(2)  Westboro Baptist church has a ministry of picketing the funerals of dead servicemen, carrying signs that say things like  “Thank God for dead soldiers,” and “God hates America.”  Efforts have been made to keep the picketers away from the funerals and from the families of the bereaved.

The Supreme Court, with only one dissenting vote (that of Justice Samuel A. Alito), ruled that the free speech provisions of the Constitution protect the protesters, who must be allowed to show up at funerals with their offensive placards.  In this case, the court favored the literal reading of the Constitution over what might be called common sense.

Supreme Court rules First Amendment protects church’s right to picket funerals

Conservatives are supposed to take the Constitution literally.  That would suggest being against allowing a victim’s dying words to be used as testimony AND supporting the free speech rights of the funeral protesters.  Is that what you believe?  If not,  what is your constitutional basis?

The greatest LCMS literary figure. . .

. . .would surely be Theodor Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss.  He was a life-long member of Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church (LCMS) in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Yesterday would have been his 107th birthday.

Celebrating Dr. Seuss.

What does Dr. Seuss tell you about Lutheranism, and what does Lutheranism tell you about Dr. Seuss?

Pakistani Christian official assassinated

Shahbaz Bhatti, Pakistan’s Ministry of Minority Affairs, was assassinated for opposing that country’s anti-blasphemy law, which is being used to persecute his fellow Christians.  He was the second official to be killed for taking this position.  At the link, see also the video in which he confesses his Christian faith and says that he is willing to die for it.

via Pakistan’s Only Christian Official Killed Over Blasphemy Law Opposition » First Thoughts | A First Things Blog.

HT:  tODD

Preaching “the King’s speech”

I was glad that The King’s Speech took all of the top prizes at the Academy Awards:  Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and (the critical but much neglected category) Best Original Screenplay.

The Lutheran Church of Canada has a nice reflection on how that movie about Prince Albert and his stuttering problem has parallels to what pastors have to do when they, in their stammering way, preach God’s Word, the true “King’s speech.”

Read it here:  Canadian Lutheran Online » Blog Archive » Stuttering kings and imperfect pastors.

Let us now praise the internet

A new study has found that young people who are active on the internet are actually more engaged with civic affairs than those who are not.  As opposed to the stereotype of teenagers plugged into their own virtual worlds and never interacting with real people and oblivious to the outside universe.   See  Does the Internet make for more engaged citizens? – MacArthur Foundation.

We have often criticized the new information technology for its baleful cultural effects–doing so, of course, using the new information technology–so let’s look at the other side of the coin.

How has the internet made you more involved with issues, improved your relationships, helped your church, or otherwise been an actual blessing, a good gift from the hand of God through the vocation of those who made all of this possible?

HT:  Webmonk


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