Olympics choose Tokyo & wrestling

Tokyo won the 2020 Olympics, beating out Istanbul and Madrid.  I’d say that was a good choice.  Also, the International Olympics committee voted to re-instate wrestling as an Olympics sport, beating out baseball, softball, and squash. [Read more...]

Opening Day

In yet another day marking the renewal that is Spring, today is the new baseball season’s Opening Day.  (That it falls on April Fools’ Day is just a coincidence.)  In observance of this significant holiday for us baseball fans, I will link to this column by E. J. Dionne, linking baseball to religion, a notion that I sort of understand but ultimately reject:  Hope’s opening day.

So keeping in mind that Opening Day is when hope springs eternal and all teams are tied and anybody can win, who do you think will win the World Series?

Spring training!

For some people, the portent of spring, with it promise of new life and new beginnings, is the first robin or the first flowers to bloom.  For baseball fans, it’s spring training.  And I am happy to say that spring training  has started!  Hope springs eternal in the human breast, and now the fans of every team are full of hope.  I’ll tell you my baseball hopes for this next season, and you tell me yours. [Read more...]

How you know when you’re an adult

Wisdom from Earl Weaver, the legendary manager of the Baltimore Orioles, who died on January 19.   “Until you’re the person that other people fall back on, until you’re the one that’s leaned on, not the person doing the leaning, you’re not an adult.” [Read more...]

“Public displays” of faith

Mollie Hemingway writes about the way the media addresses the late Stan Musial’s religion.  Most of the obituaries ignored it completely, but she focuses on how it’s handled in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.  Here we are told that, yes, Musial was religious, but that he practiced it privately, never pushing it on anybody, and avoiding public displays. But Mollie (I can call her by her first name because I know her) then raises a question that transcends baseball:  What constitutes a public display of faith? [Read more...]

Stan the Man

One of the most awe-inspiring baseball players of all time died last Saturday, Stan “the Man” Musial.  He was a great, great player for the St. Louis Cardinals with a lifetime batting average of .331.  He was also celebrated for his good sportsmanship, his refusal to complain, his good-nature, and.   his generosity to fans.  Sort of the anti-Lance Armstrong.

From his Washington Post obituary by Dennis Drabelle:

Stan “The Man” Musial, one of major league baseball’s most prolific hitters and a model of good sportsmanship during his Hall of Fame career with the St. Louis Cardinals, died Saturday. He was 92.

The death was announced by the team. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that he had Alzheimer’s disease.

The most beloved Cardinal of all, Mr. Musial led the National League in batting seven times in the 1940s and ’50s and was voted the league’s most valuable player three times. His lifetime batting average was .331, his total of 3,630 hits ranks fourth all-time, and he was a perennial all-star. After spending the entirety of his 22-year career with the Cardinals, Mr. Musial retired in 1963 with so many firsts to his credit that he may have carved out a new category: the record for holding the most records at one time. . . . [Read more...]


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