A handbook for Classical Lutheran Education

I’m at the Consortium for Classical & Lutheran Education conference in Ft. Wayne, Indiana.  To add to the organization’s school accreditation program, we announced a process for teacher certification in this approach.  Also announced was a new resource:  A Handbook for Classical Lutheran Education.

Edited by Cheryl Swope, Steven Hein, Paul Cain, and Tom Strickland, and with a foreword by me, the book began as a “best of” publication drawn from the CCLE’s journal over the years.  But the articles were selected so as to provide a handbook showing what classical education entails, what is distinctive about a Lutheran approach, and how to implement it, whether in a classroom or at home. [Read more...]

Classical education in the news

Nice sympathetic piece at the CNN education blog about the Classical Christian education movement.  From Julia Duin:

In Maryland, a group of students ponder which depiction of the Nativity shows true beauty: A 14th-century Giotto, a 16th-century Barocci or a 20th-century William Congdon. The students are in seventh grade.

Outside Houston, second-graders learn Latin amid the Doric columns, Romanesque arches and the golden Renaissance hues of a gracious brick building. [Read more...]

Classical Lutheran Education conference

The Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education (CCLE) will hold its annual conference at Concordia Theological Seminary in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, on July 16-18.  I’ll be there!  The conference will kick off a teacher certification program and will feature extended teacher-training seminars just for that purpose, in addition to sessions on all kinds of topics.  (See them after the jump.)

For more details and to register, go here. [Read more...]

More Classical Lutheran Education online

I told you about Wittenberg Academy, offering an entire classical Lutheran high school curriculum online.  Those are asynchronous courses, which means they are self-contained and may be taken whenever the student wants to fire up the computer, though there is personal interaction with the teacher and other students built in.   Now Faith Lutheran Church in Plano, Texas, which has an excellent classical Lutheran high school, is making some of its courses available to homeschoolers live.  Pastor Woelmer of Faith, Plano, sent me this notice:

Faith Lutheran High School is a classical high school in Plano, Texas. Faith will now offer classes live using two-way HD-Video streaming through the Internet. The student will see the teacher on their home computer or lap-top, see the notes the teacher puts on the e-board, listen to the lecture, participate in live discussions with other students, and the teacher will be able to see the student as well.

Faith will offer the Omnibus 1 and Omnibus 3 classes taught from a Lutheran perspective. The Omnibus class consists of English, Theology, and History (3 credits) and is taught by a professional Lutheran school teacher with many years of classroom experience. Classes will start August 22, 2012.For more information, including cost and other details, call 972-423-7448 or send an email to: school@faithplanoschool.org.

Classical Lutheran education conference

Come to  The Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education conference, July 17-19, 2012, at Memorial Lutheran Church & School in Houston, Texas.    I’ll be there!   Here is a summary of what’s on tap:

Plenary Speakers
Rev. Todd Wilken of Issues, Etc., for discussions on essential matters of Lutheran education
Dr. Gene Edward Veith for insights and commentary on classical education

Session Leaders include…

Dr. E. Christian Kopff with a discussion of Milton’s essay, “On Education”

Rev. Dr. Steven Hein on matters of apologetics and Lutheran theology

Rev. Mark Preus on teaching Latin

Tim Merritt on teaching the Great Books

Dr. James Tallmon on the Trivium

Mrs. Jackie Veith on the Quadrivium

Dr. Gene Edward Veith in a session on the Family and Vocation from his new book

Janet Muth on Teaching Music Classically

Cheryl Swope on Classical and Lutheran Education with the Special-Needs Child

Rev. Stephen Kieser on Teaching History and Literature in the Home School

Kelly Rottmann on Efficiency in the Home School

Rev. Mark Grunst, Praying the Catechism with Children

Rev. Dan Praeuner with a cost-effective homeschool/school hybrid approach to
classical and Lutheran education

Jocelyn Benson from Wittenberg Academy

and more….

Registration covers sessions from noon 7/17 – noon 7/19, as well as membership
in CCLE, the Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education.

For more information, please visit www.ccle.org,

 

HT:  Cheryl Swope

New online classical Lutheran school

One of the promising developments in homeschooling is the advent of on-line courses.  Parents can now enroll their children in an entire on-line school or in individual hard-to-teach-on-your-own classes.  A promising venture that many Lutheran homeschoolers are excited about is  Wittenberg Academy, an online classical Lutheran school, featuring strong confessional theology and an academically-rich curriculum for high-schoolers.  After long preparation, Wittenberg Academy is now taking registrations for the Fall.  (Sorry, for the “Michaelmas Term.”  Isn’t that cool, having a “Michaelmas Term”?)  Here is the notice I received:

Christ is risen! He is risen indeed! Alleluia! It is with exceeding joy that I share with you the news that registration for the 2012-13 academic year is live!

After much ado about much, we decided to go the simple route for the time being and explore better options in the future for accepting online payments, etc. For now, you can go to http://www.wittenbergacademy.org/registration.html and fill out the online form. Once we receive your registration, we will email you with payment options and a summary of your registration.

As the form is very simple, be sure to check out http://www.wittenbergacademy.org/2012-13course_descriptions.html for any prerequisites and in which term a class is being offered.

At each step of this journey of bringing you the best in online Classical Lutheran education, we trust God for his timing and provision. While our timing would have included live registration several months ago, we trust that this is God’s best for Wittenberg Academy and thank you for your patience.

Here are a few items for your consideration: Michaelmas Term runs September 4, 2012- November 21, 2012 Christmas Term runs November 26, 2012- March 1, 2013 with Christmas break from December 22, 2012- January 6, 2013 Easter Term runs March 11, 2013- May 31, 2013 with Easter break from March 28- April 1 and no class on Memorial Day (May 27)

Each class is one credit with the exception of the Paideia courses, which are three credits. Each credit (class) is $400. Thus, all classes, with the exception of the Paideia courses, are $400.

The Paideia courses are $1200. If you have any questions about registration, be sure to contact me! Again, we thank you for your patience and look forward to partnering with you during the 2012-13 academic year!

Jocelyn

Mrs. Jocelyn Benson, Head Teacher Wittenberg Academy

mrsbenson@wittenbergacademy.org www.wittenbergacademy.org

Courses offered this term include Math (Algebra I, pre-Calculus, & Calculus I&II), Languages (Latin, Greek, & German), Science (biology & chemistry), Liberal Arts (beginning and intermediate courses in grammar, logic, & rhetoric; also several music courses), Theology (“Liturgical Theology & Sacramental Piety”), four levels of “Paideia” (an integrated humanities curriculum, studying history, literature, philosophy, etc.), and electives (Physical Education, Psychology, & Personal Finance).

Another option is for parochial schools to supplement their offerings with some of these online courses.

 

The history of classical Christian education

I am very excited about the publication of Thomas Korcok’s  Lutheran Education: From Wittenberg to the Future.  It supplies what has long been needed:  a history of classical Christian education as practiced in the Reformation tradition.  Dr. Korcok shows that the Lutheran approach to  education has always been the classical liberal arts + catechesis.

He also shows that the various theological conflicts were also manifested in educational conflicts:  The scholastics did practice the liberal arts  but with an emphasis on logic, whereas the Renaissance & Reformation educators emphasized rhetoric, with its attention to original texts (such as the Bible).  The Renaissance humanists tended to believe that the liberal arts were sufficient to instill morality, but the Lutherans insisted also on the necessity of Christian catechesis.  The enthusiasts, considering the liberal arts too worldly, wanted only Bible-reading schools.  The pietists also considered the liberal arts too worldly and wanted schools to concentrate only on job-training.   The rationalists considered the liberal arts too old fashioned, wanting only scientific education.  But the Lutherans believed that the liberal arts approach to education–training students broadly, with lots of history, great books, and objective knowledge from mathematics through music–combined with rigorous catechesis, was the best approach in forming young people so that they can think like a Lutheran.

Pastors, parochial school teachers, and parents should read this book.   So should anyone interested in classical Christian education.  (I suspect that much of what holds true for Lutherans also applies to various Reformed educators, who also practiced this approach.)

Here is what Paul McCain of CPH says about the book:

A great new book is now available on Lutheran education which, historically, has been the key to the success of the Lutheran Church’s ability to transmit the confession of the Church to future generations. You may order it here, via the web, or call 800-325-3040. Here is a sample for you to download.

The liberal arts model has traditionally been preferred in Lutheran elementary classrooms. No other educational paradigm so well meets the requirements of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. There is no reason that the liberal arts cannot be adapted to meet contemporary needs. The question is, what should be the main focus of a contemporary presentation of the arts?

Thomas Korcok demonstrates how the Wittenberg theologians settled on a liberal arts education as the preferred model for Evangelical Christian elementary schools. He then traces how that model persisted and was adapted as Lutherans moved from Europe to North America. Korcok concludes that the liberal arts model fits our contemporary setting as changes in society today make it ever more important to have an elementary education that is compatible with Evangelical Theology. The book includes:

-Historic exploration of educational models in view of theological truths
-The challenge of influences that push educators either to the Word as objective truth or away from the Word toward secular standards of truth
-A definition of an Evangelical Liberal Arts approach, its flexibility, and how it fits into classrooms today
-Extensive references to educational, historical, and theological literature

via Lutheran Education: From Wittenberg to the Future – New Book from Concordia Publishing House | CyberBrethren-A Lutheran Blog.

You can order the book from the link in my first paragraph or from the CPH website, along with downloading a free sample.  The book is scheduled for release in August, but you can pre-order it.   I wrote the foreword.

Along these lines, I should put in a plug for the 11th annual Conference of the Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education, July 12-14,  in Sheridan Wyoming, which is where I am heading this week.  I’ll be giving a couple of talks.  If you are in Sheridan, be sure to  introduce yourself!

Classical Lutheran Education

The Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education celebrates its tenth anniversary with its tenth annual conference in Concordia, Missouri, June 22-24.  In addition to all kinds of workshops on curriculum, teaching, and catechesis, the plenary speaker will be Rev. Thomas Korcok of the Lutheran Church of Canada.

He has done some remarkable research for his doctorate on classical education in the Lutheran tradition. I’ve seen it.  He shows how the classical liberal arts were key to Luther’s whole educational project, including the teaching of the doctrine of vocation.  He also shows how the Reformation impacted the liberal arts.  He then traces classical education through church history, including the schools established by the Lutheran immigrants in America, from C. F. W. Walther through the Lutheran educational system of the not-t0o-distant past to the revival of classical Lutheran education as represented by the CCLE today.

Rev. Korcok will be giving three plenary lectures, and I know they will be really good.  I’ll be talking about an integrated humanities curriculum I’ve been working on, the new volumes of the Omnibus series from Veritas Press.

The conference will be held on the campus of St. Paul Lutheran High School, the last of the Missouri Synod’s boarding schools, a little ways from Kansas City.

Homeschoolers, schoolers, teachers, pastors, and anyone interested are all welcome.

Go here for more information and to register:  The Consortium for Classical and Lutheran Education :: Home.