Planned Parenthood fights back against defunding

We taxpayers give Planned Parenthood a half-billion dollars a year, something a measure that goes before the Senate as early as this evening would end.  So the abortion-industrial complex has issued talking points for its followers (see this and this in a single issue of the Washington Post) arguing that to defund Planned Parenthood would be a pro-abortion bill.  The reasoning being that if the organization can’t give give out contraceptives, then there will be more abortions.

But even if you accept the premise that contraceptives are a good thing, Obamacare makes them free from any drug store!  And even those who don’t have health insurance, even the government-subsidized plans, can get them free from community health clinics.  There are 9,059 of those, compared to 669 Planned Parenthood offices.  Even taking abortion off the table, why should taxpayers give all that money to Planned Parenthood AND the community clinics AND the insurance companies in Obamacare? [Read more…]

Automatic birth control?

Ruth Marcus cites a “thought experiment” put forward in a new book:

Imagine that all women in the United States, upon becoming sexually active, were automatically fitted with an intrauterine device or other form of long-acting birth control. [Read more…]

So how do contraceptives work?

Pro-lifers are told not to worry about the morning after pill, as mandated by Obamacare.  It doesn’t work by preventing the fertilized egg from being implanted in the womb, though that was how it used to be described.  It simply prevents ovulation, just like a regular birth control pill.  (Though how it prevents pregnancy the morning after ovulation has occurred is not clear.)  See the facts cited and the links given in our discussion of the Morning After pill on this blog here and here.

But when pro-lifers promote measures defining “personhood” as existing from the moment of conception, we are told that this would outlaw contraception, including the birth control pill, which–though we were always told it prevents ovulation–prevents the fertilized egg from being implanted in the womb.  (Example after the jump.)  If that’s true, many women would not want to take the things.  But that’s not what they have been told about how they work.

Is this dishonesty, rhetorical manipulation, or ignorance?  And what should we conclude about contraception from this controversy? [Read more…]