Corporate America’s alliance with cultural left

Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal says that corporate America is foolish to ally with leftists in opposing religious liberty in the name of gay marriage:

Referring to the recent events surrounding Indiana’s Religious Liberty Restoration Act, Jindal said corporate America teamed up with the radical left “to come after our religious liberty rights.” Jindal warned, “Corporate America needs to be careful because the same radical left that doesn’t want us to have religious liberty rights does not want us to have economic liberty rights. The same radical left that doesn’t want us to have religious liberty rights wants to tax and regulate these companies out of existence. They think profit is a dirty word.”

More from Jindal’s speech after the jump.  So why do you think the big corporations have joined  the pro-gay cause?

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Economic discrimination

Apple, Angie’s List, and other companies were threatening to boycott the state of Indiana, thinking its Religious Freedom statute would allow businesses to discriminate against gays.  In doing so, these companies were saying that they have the right to act on their managers’ sincerely held beliefs that they should not do business with those they disapprove of.  But this is exactly what the bakers, photographers, and florists who do not approve of participating in gay marriage want to do!  Why should corporations be allowed to discriminate against an entire state, due to their conflicting beliefs, and individuals not be allowed to?  So observes Jordan Ballor, excerpted after the jump. [Read more...]

Corporations aren’t funding campaigns after all?

When the Supreme Court ruled that the law limiting corporate contributions was an infringement of the right to free speech, the conventional wisdom was–and is–that now big businesses will buy politicians by funding their elections.  But it hasn’t turned out that way.  Corporations aren’t giving much money at all to political candidates.

The ruling allowing unlimited “corporate” giving–”corporate” meaning collective organizations, not just business corporations–is indeed magnifying the reach of  issue-driven organizations, which would be in accord with free political speech.  And wealthy individuals, such as George Soros and the Koch brothers (notice how those who demonize one don’t demonize the other), can throw their weight around with their money.  One might still worry about the influence of campaign contributions.  But the point here is that business corporations are not, on the whole, giving many political contributions.  They have found that giving money to politicians can just alienate some of their customers and that they can get more influence for their buck by hiring lobbyists. [Read more...]

Big corporations support gay marriage

Belying the leftist myth that big corporations are conservative,  379 major businesses filed friend-of-the-court briefs supporting gay marriage for when the Supreme Court hears arguments on the issue on April 28. [Read more...]

The higher calling of corporate mission statements

Thanks to David Bergquist for alerting me to an article in the Wall Street Journal about how corporate mission statements are now all about “changing the world” and other idealistic and even religious motivations (including having a “mission”), rather than just making a product.   This demonstrates both people’s need for a sense of vocation and their misunderstanding about what a vocation actually entails.

Read an excerpt and follow the link after the jump, then consider what I have to say about this. [Read more...]

Intrusive corporations

An executive with Uber, the app-based cab service, said how he wants to spend $1 million to dig up dirt on its critics, wanting to get at “your personal lives, your families.”  This from the same company that blogged about the data it has on its riders’ “brief overnight weekend stays”; that is, sexual rendezvous.

But Uber is not the only company that is amassing vast stores of personal data on its customers and that is not afraid to use it.  We worry about an intrusive government invading our privacy and taking away our liberties.  But we have constitutional protection against that, for whatever that is worth.  But what about intrusive companies invading our privacy and taking away our liberties? [Read more...]


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