Reading on Kindle vs. reading on paper

The London Guardian reports on a study of reading on a Kindle as compared to reading a traditional book.   Readers of the paper version performed significantly better when it came to reconstructing the chronological order of incidents in the plot.  The story cites another study that found 10th graders had significantly higher comprehension rates when they read the paper version, as opposed to a digitalized text.

Read the findings after the jump.  I then give my experience (which is rather different from what the study finds) and ask about yours.

[Read more...]

E-books are increasing reading

E-books and e-readers are increasing the amount of reading that is going on.  People who get a Kindle are reading more than they used to, including reading books that aren’t electronic.

A fifth of American adults have read an electronic version of a book in the last year, a trend that is fueling a renewed love of reading, according to a new survey.

The portion of e-book readers among all American adults has increased to 21 percent from 17 percent between December and February, due in large part to a boom in tablet and e-reader sales this past holiday season.

All those devices are turning some consumers into super readers, according to a survey released Thursday by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. E-book readers plowed through an average of 24 titles in the past year, compared with an average of 15 for readers of physical books.

“Those who have taken the plunge into reading e-books stand out in almost every way from other kinds of readers . . . They are avid readers of books in all formats,” said Lee Rainie, director of research at Pew.

Curiously, e-reading somehow sparks a love of books in any format. Even as e-readers are downloading books on computers, tablets and smartphones, they are also checking out more books at libraries and buying more at bookstores and online. About nine in 10 e-book readers said they have also read printed books in the past year, Pew reported in its survey of about 3,000 people 16 and older.

via Survey finds e-readers are spurring consumers of books in all formats – The Washington Post.

I find that happening with me.  I read a lot, of course, as a literature teacher and someone who wants to keep up with things.  But ever since my wife gave me a Kindle–which as an old-school print guy I was skeptical of at first– I find myself reading much more for fun (bringing back pleasures that got me into the literature profession in the first place).  I can crank up the type-size so that I can read on the treadmill (which re-enforces that good habit I’m trying to cultivate) and instead of aimless surfing on the computer or watching television, I am now reading novels. Also books don’t cost as much when you download them, further liberating my reading impulses.

What I’m enjoying is not novels of ambitious literary merit–that’s more like work–but books that give me an interesting imaginative experience.  They have to be well-written with a certain measure of complexity, otherwise they can’t hold my attention, so genre fiction and bestseller fare doesn’t always do it for me.  But I’ve found some gems that I think I’ll be blogging about.

By the way, with my Kindle I’ve signed up for Amazon Prime, giving me the ability to “check out” books from Amazon’s virtual library for free.  Unfortunately, the pickings seem pretty slim.  I did find a couple of excellent reads:  Moneyball and Hunger Games.   (More on the latter later.)  If anyone has found other good books in that library–ones that meet my criteria–I’d be glad to learn about them.

Anyway, if you have broken down and bought an e-reader, has this “kindled” your reading?

Any Kindle suggestions?

I’m becoming a regular high-tech kind of guy, though at least I’m a late adopter.  I now have a Kindle.  (My wife wanted one for Mother’s Day, so I obliged, whereupon since I was always borrowing hers, she bought me one for Father’s Day.  Our devices are hooked up to the same account so that when either of us buy a book it is “archived” on the other’s device, allowing us to download each other’s books for free.)  I carry around with me some 22 books and they don’t weigh a thing.  That makes it great for the traveling I have been doing lately.  The device will even read the book aloud to you, in a technology I do not understand.  (If anyone does, please explain it to me.  Also explain how the voice feature on my GPS device–see!  more technology!–works.)  That makes it a good treadmill companion, helping me not be  so bored as I pursue physical health.  Then I learned that I can increase the size of the type so that I can read it myself on the treadmill.

I can’t say I don’t prefer paper, but I’ve gotten used to reading on the Kindle.  In addition to reading what I consider “fun” books, I have downloaded some great classics for free or nearly so, including volumes of the complete works of G. K. Chesterton (one of my favorite writers of all time, but who has written lots of stuff I haven’t read yet) and Agatha Christie.  Also the complete Sherlock Holmes stories.  And I love my The Lutheran Study Bible on Kindle, which is set up so that you simply click the passages to read the notes, all in big and readable print.  Also my Treasury of Daily Prayer.  (Click the links to get them yourself.)

Many writers are finding that they can make their books available through Kindle directly without going through a publisher, taking all of the money themselves while also making their books cheaper for their readers.  The problem is, a publisher vets books, keeping out those that are unreadable, and also makes people aware of them.  It’s thus hard to know about worthy books that are electronically published, except by word of mouth.   So let’s have some word of mouth.

What are some good Kindle titles that you would recommend?

Get the Cranach blog via Kindle

It is now possible to get this blog regularly downloaded on your Kindle. Click here.

(Thanks to Joe G for suggesting this and to Paul McCain for telling me how to do it.)


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X