Managers vs. leaders in the Secret Service

The country keeps getting embarrassed by Secret Service agents who have been caught cavorting with prostitutes, getting drunk, and passing out in hotel lobbies.  Former agent Dan Emmett says the main problem is bad leadership.  He tells about the Secret Service’s practice of promoting people who are “well-liked” to management positions, rather than those who demonstrate leadership ability.  His distinction between “managers” and “leaders” has applications  beyond the Secret Service. [Read more...]

Introverts strike back

The ideal in the business world, especially for corporate leaders, has been the glad-handing extrovert.  Consequently, private offices have given way to open cubicles so that everyone can mix and collaborate, even though that seldom happens.  Also, everyone has to go to brainstorming meetings, even though research has shown that the best ideas come not from groups but from individuals thinking alone.  But now a new appreciation for introverts in the workplace and in leadership positions is emerging.

Susan Cain has written a book on the subject:  Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.  After the jump, an interview with her about her findings.

[Read more...]

Entitlement behavior

Ruth Marcus has a column on entitlement behavior:

By entitlement behavior, I mean the apparent belief of too many political figures — make that too many male political figures — that the ordinary rules of acceptable conduct do not apply to them. Exhibits A, B and C are former International Monetary Fund head Dominique Strauss-Kahn, former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and former Nevada Sen. John Ensign.

Their alleged or admitted actions differ, but these episodes are linked by more than improper sexual activity. These men seem to have thought they could get away with this behavior — not despite their celebrity and power but, at least in part, because of it.

via Bigshots behaving badly – The Washington Post.

The entitlement mindset does not have to manifest itself in sexual scandals like these, but it’s a real danger among leaders of every kind, from pastors to business executives.   Wanting “perks,” expecting kow-towing, concern for one’s status–these can interfere with loving and serving those you are leading, and, hence, the vocation of leadership.


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