What’s in our new book?

The book I put together with John Warwick Montgomery, Where Christ Is Present, consists of some brilliant essays on different aspects of Lutheran teaching and practice.  As the Amazon reviews are saying of particular essays, each one is worth the price of the book.  And they aren’t just rehashing of old arguments and stale polemics.  They bring something new to the discussions and present the concept in fresh ways.

Some of them actually break new ground, or present things that I, at least, had never known before.  For example, Adam Francisco’s chapter on the Scriptures shows how the Early Church affirmed the Bible as its sole authority; later, it developed the concept of “tradition,” while insisting that the tradition is consistent with and normed by the Bible; later, though, some theologians started to teach that tradition is, in effect, above the Bible; not till fairly late in the Middle Ages was the Papacy elevated as a superior authority to both the Bible and tradition.  I never knew that.

I also learned a great deal from Angus Menuge about the influence of Lutheranism on science; Craig Parton on Christian liberty and how that is manifested in the work of the great Lutheran artist Johann Sebastian Bach; Steve Hein on the nature of the Christian life; and. . . well, all of them really.  After the jump is the Table of Contents, giving the list of chapters and their authors.

[Read more…]

Our new book: Where Christ Is Present

I have collaborated with John Warwick Montgomery in editing and contributing to a new book that has just come out:  Where Christ Is Present: A Theology for All Seasons on the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation.

It’s a collection of essays that constitute an apologetic for Lutheranism, making the case that Lutheran theology and practice is uniquely relevant to our times.  One of its purposes is to help people looking for a church home, particularly evangelicals who are frustrated with their own tradition, to the point of considering Catholicism, Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, or something else.  We want them to check out Lutheranism.

The book consists of chapters by A. S. Francisco, Rod Rosenbladt, Harold Senkbeil, Todd Wilken, Uwe Siemon-Netto, Craig A. Parton, Steven A. Hein, Angus J. L. Menuge, and Cameron A. MacKenzie, in addition to Dr. Montgomery and me.  After the jump, the description on Amazon.  I’ll be talking more about the book over the course of the week. [Read more…]

You Might Be a Lutheran If…

The invaluable Anthony Sacramone has put together a mashup of theological culture and Jeff Foxworthy, resulting in a list of 20 descriptors entitled “You Might be a Lutheran if. . . .”  My favorite:  “You think the pope is the antichrist but still a Christian.”  After the jump, the first part of the list and a link to the rest.

My challenge: Add to them.  (Bonus:  Explain Mr. Sacramone’s more obscure references.)

My other challenge:  Come up with something similar for other Christian traditions, preferably one you are a member of.  (“You might be a Catholic if. . .”; “You might be a Baptist if. . . .”; “You might be a Calvinist if. . . .”; You might be Orthodox if. . . .”; “You might be a theological liberal if. . . .”; etc., etc.)

[Read more…]

Laestadian Lutherans and their large families

Rev. Christopher Jackson informed me that the new Prime Minister of Finland is a Laestadian Lutheran, a pietist strain best known today for rejecting birth control and having very large families. [Read more…]

Why Marco Rubio goes to two churches

A piece on the religious beliefs of presidential candidate Marco Rubio says that he attends both a Baptist church with his family and also attends mass at the  Roman Catholic church of his childhood.  This is because he appreciates gospel preaching and also “craves” Holy Communion.  He says, “I wondered why there couldn’t be a church that offered both a powerful, contemporary gospel message and the actual body and blood of Jesus.”

There is such a thing, Marco Rubio!  It’s called the Lutheran church!  You don’t have to go to two different churches to get both the Gospel and the true Body and Blood of Christ.  Those go together, which is the whole point of Lutheranism.  Why don’t people know this?  [Read more…]

The sacrifice of Christians

Rev. Adam Roe, in the series on vocation at MissionWork, discusses the concept of “sacrifice” in the Lutheran confessions.  Unlike in Roman Catholicism, Holy Communion is not seen as a sacrifice, nor are pastors considered priests who offer up sacrifices.  And yet Christians are called to sacrifice, but not for the forgiveness of sins, since Christ, who is both our Priest and our Sacrifice, has accomplished the only sacrifice we need.  But the Apology of the Augsburg Confession does speak about the sacrifices that pastors and all Christians perform. [Read more…]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X