The First Amendment Defense Act

A bill is before Congress that would protect individuals, churches, and other organizations from being discriminated against because of their beliefs about gay marriage.  The First Amendment Defense Act, which ingeniously frames the issue in terms of discrimination, has been bottled up in committee for over a year.  Lawmakers don’t seem to want to take it up, even though Republicans control both houses.

Though President Obama would surely veto the bill, both Ted Cruz and Donald Trump (though not John Kasich) have promised to sign it. [Read more…]

The most romantic things you can do

Go to church together.  Pray together.   According to a new study, couples who do those things have stronger and more satisfying relationships.

Read the whole article by Rachel Lu in The Federalist, linked to an excerpted after the jump.  She also ties this research into that Swiss study that found that when the father goes to church, the children will go to church when they are adults (and vice versa).

[Read more…]

Christianity’s influence on marriage & the status of women

According to the “progressive narrative,” Christianity and its view of marriage have oppressed women.  But as David Theroux points out, drawing on actual scholarship,  the actual influence of Christianity is quite different. [Read more…]

How should the church respond?

Russell Moore on the gay marriage ruling and on how churches should respond:

As I write this, the Supreme Court has handed down what will be the “Roe v. Wade” of marriage, redefining marriage in all 50 states. This is a sober moment, and I am a conscientious dissenter from this ruling. The Court now has disregarded thousands of years of definition of the most foundational unit of society, and the cultural changes here will be broad and deep. So how should the church respond? [Read more…]

Between first sleep and second sleep

About two years ago, we posted First Sleep, Second Sleep, which became the 12th most-read post on this blog, with people to this day clicking on it.  It had to do with what historians have discovered about sleep patterns in the days before artificial lighting, from ancient and Biblical days through the 17th century.  People would go to bed shortly after it turned dark, sleep for four hours, wake up for two or three hours, then go back to sleep for another four hours.  During the period of wakefulness between “first sleep” and “second sleep,” people would talk, read, and pray.  This seems to have been the main time when married couples would make love.  Artificial lighting–not just candles but oil lamps and especially electric lighting–changed people’s sleeping patterns, letting us stay up late, though patterns of insomnia suggest that first sleep and second sleep is deep wired into our nature.

Anyway, researchers have been studying this phenomenon.  Test subjects made to go to sleep when it gets dark, after a period of adjustment, fall back into the pattern.  But then scientists discovered something else.  That time between first sleep and second sleep is characterized by a unique state of consciousness.  Although the person is fully awake, he or she is in a state of deep rest, relaxation, and peace.

Clark Strand, who has written a book on the subject, relates it to the “mindfulness” of Eastern meditation.  I don’t think we have to go all mystical about it, like he does (though the connection might suggest why “the night watches” were such a good time for Bible reading and prayer), but I’m curious what this would have meant for marriages.  Marital intimacy–sex, yes, but also conversation–may well have been heightened during this nightly state of mind.  “Sleeping together” may have been more than a euphemism, perhaps a description of an deep intimacy that may be difficult to attain today. [Read more…]

The financial problems of just living together

There are strong moral reasons why couples shouldn’t just live together without being married.  There are also strong psychological reasons why this is not a good idea.  (See also this.)  The Washington Post‘s financial advice columnist, Michelle Singletary, points out that there are also strong financial reasons not to, that sharing housing expenses, bank accounts, and buying property together can be disastrous if the couple isn’t married. [Read more…]


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