The Santa Barbara killings

Is there anything that can be said about the 22-year-old who killed six people–stabbing three, then shooting three more before killing himself–in Santa Barbara?  Elliott Rodger, the affluent son of the assistant director of the Hunger Games,  gave his reasons in a 171-page manifesto and a series of YouTube videos, but his motive comes down to his frustration that no women would have sex with him.

My impression is that this mass murder has to do with some unique pathologies of pop culture–a child of Hollywood who wanted to be a star, whose life was mostly in the media, and who was outraged that the easy sex of the movies wasn’t so easy for him. [Read more...]

Remodeling the Navy Yard building

We blogged about the phenomenon of tearing down or otherwise effacing buildings where terrible crimes were committed.  It was announced that the Navy Yard office building in Washington, D.C., the site of the recent mass shooting in which 12 people were killed, is going to be extensively remodeled at a cost of $6.4 million so as to change the interior so that it won’t conjure up bad associations. [Read more...]

What to do with the site of a mass murder?

The house in Milwaukee where Jeffrey Dahmer committed his grisly acts of murder and cannibalism was just torn down.  Who would want to live in a place where such evil happened?  The Amish community tore down the schoolhouse where a killer murdered five little girls.  Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut, where all those children were shot, is going to be demolished, whereupon a new schoolhouse will be erected on the very same spot.

So should we do the same with that movie multiplex in Colorado or the office building at the Navy Yard? [Read more...]

He murdered 77 “out of good, not evil”

Few people do bad things out of a desire to do something evil.  Rather, they convince themselves that what they are doing is “good.”  And the spirit of self-righteousness, ironically, can lead to the most horrible of sins.  An example is the testimony of the Norwegian mass-murderer, of whose 77 victims, 69 were young people at a youth camp:

The Norwegian far-right activist who killed 77 people last year has told a court that he was fighting a battle against multi-culturalism and acted out of “goodness, not evil”.

Reading from a 13-page document that he wrote in custody, Anders Behring Breivik defended his massacre and called it the most “spectacular attack by a nationalist militant since World War Two”.

He said he would repeat his actions again, if he could.

“Yes, I would do it again,” he said, adding that life in prison or dying for “his people” would be “the biggest honour”.

The 33-year-old lashed out at the Norwegian and other European governments for embracing immigration and multi-culturalism and claimed he was a “second-rate citizen”.

He said the aim of the killings was for “racial purity” and to “change the direction of multi-cultural drift to avoid greater confrontation and civil war”.

He claimed the only way he could “protect the white native Norwegian” was through violence. . . .

Journalist Trygve Sorvaag, who is tweeting inside the court for Sky News, said: “For many people, it was very surprising to hear how soft, almost nasal, his voice was. He didn’t appear dangerous in any way.

“It was very hard to see that this softly spoken man is actually the person who murdered 77 people.”

via Norway Killer: Trial Of Anders Behring Breivik – Far-Right Utoya Island Shootings And Oslo Explosion | World News | Sky News.

Can you think of other cases in which “goodness” becomes a cover for “evil”?


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