Making dismemberment abortion sound better

Kansas has banned late-term abortions that dismember the child.  Other states are considering passing the same law.  You have got to read the news story in the Washington Post, excerpted after the jump.  You might notice some bias in the story.  But notice to what extent the journalist has to twist her language–to the point of outlandish euphemism–to make this barbaric procedure palatable. [Read more...]

Do kids raised by same-sex couples really fare better?

The media has been trumpeting an Australian study that purported to show that children raised by same-sex parents actually fare better than those raised in traditional families.  That’s quite a claim.  Until you look more closely at the study. [Read more...]

Media finally covering abortionist’s murder trial

In Philadelphia, the abortionist Dr. Kermit Gosnell is on trial for capital murder, having killed a patient through his ineptitude and babies born alive through his cruelty.  The major media has up-to-now pretty much ignored this trial, but is now giving it some attention, thanks in part to a twitter campaign started by Lutheran journalist Mollie Hemingway. [Read more...]

Be skeptical about political journalism

The New York Times broke a shocking story:

Joe Ricketts, an up-by-the-bootstraps billionaire whose varied holdings include a name-brand brokerage firm in Omaha, a baseball team in Chicago, herds of bison in Wyoming and a start-up news Web site in New York, wanted to be a player in the 2012 election. On Thursday he was, though not in the way he had intended.

Word that Mr. Ricketts had considered bankrolling a $10 million advertising campaign linking President Obama to the incendiary race-infused statements of his former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr., brought waves of denunciation from Mitt Romney, the Obama campaign and much of the rest of the political world.

via Joe Ricketts Rejects Plan to Finance Anti-Obama Ads – NYTimes.com.

It seems Ricketts, an owner of the Chicago Cubs, started a Super-PAC to support Mitt Romney.  One of the proposals put forward by a political operative was to associate President Obama with Rev. Jeremiah Wright, his radical former pastor.  Apparently, the proposal was “racially tinged.”   So Ricketts and Romney are getting slammed accordingly.

But Mitt Romney has repudiated the tactic.  Even more to the point, RICKETTS repudiated the ad.   There is no ad!  Ricketts refused to fund it.  Not once it hit papers, at the time it was proposed!   Somebody suggested doing this, but everyone said “no.”

So what is the story?  There is no story.

It would be as if a reporter from Fox News was in a bar and overheard some drunk say, “I’m for Obama, and I gave his campaign twenty bucks!  And I think the first thing he should do is kill all the capitalists!”  The reporter then runs a story with the headline, “Obama supporter calls for killing capitalists.”

 

Was Mitt Romney a high school bully?

The Washington Post has a big story of the sort that opposition researchers love, an event from the past that can discredit a candidate with voters.  Reportedly, when Mitt Romney was in high school, he and some friends jumped a guy with long hair–someone who was also teased as being gay–and cut his hair.

Romney does not remember the incident, but has apologized anyway.  Meanwhile, some bloggers are questioning the story, noting at least one big contradiction in the account.

First of all, is this a legitimate story, or is it biased gotcha journalism with a political purpose?

Second, is it fair to use a person’s childhood or adolescent behavior to discredit him as an adult?

Third, does this incident disclose a character flaw that should disqualify a person from public office?

Fourth, do you think this report could harm Romney’s squeaky-clean image, to the point of making voters–who often care more for image than for issues–think that he’s mean and so refuse to vote for him?

Finally, is this story a portent that  journalism, political discourse, and our democratic republic are all doomed?

 

via Mitt Romney’s prep school classmates recall pranks, but also troubling incidents – The Washington Post.

The exotic and sinister world of Iowa

You’ve got to read Mollie Hemingway’s take down of that article in The Atlantic, in which University of Iowa journalism professor Stephen Bloom ridicules the state that pays his salary for being religious, for having so many farmers, for eating casseroles, and other rather normal qualities that he finds shocking.

I’ll just quote Mollie’s introduction, with its great story from her father, but you’ll want to read the whole thing:

My dad used to tell me a story about a man getting off of a train and asking the station manager for information about the town he’d just arrived in. “What’s the town you’re from like?” the station manager asks. The man explains that it’s not very nice. The people aren’t that smart or nice and the food isn’t that great and you can’t keep a job and the ladies are all uppity. “Well, I imagine you’ll find this town’s a lot like that, too,” the station manager responds. When the next train stops, another man gets off and asks the station manager the same question. “What’s the town you’re from like?” the station manager asks. The second man explains that he was blessed to come from a beautiful town with nice people full of interesting conversation and fun hobbies. People work hard, the kids are generally fun and he misses it terribly. “Well, I imagine you’ll find this town’s a lot like that, too,” the station manager responds.

You get the point. Well, I thought of that story when I read this absolutely hilarious (unintentionally, I should mention) piece in The Atlantic about how much University of Iowa journalism professor Stephen G. Bloom loathes his state.

via Iowa’s ‘uneducated Jesus freaks’ » GetReligion.

Be sure to follow her links to this  parody of Bloom’s article and to the reaction of Iowans.

But what conclusions can we draw from this?


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