One of my favorite online newspapers

That would have to be The Federalist.  One of the minds behind it is Lutheran journalist Mollie Hemingway.  But it’s all good.  I find it to be unfailingly fresh, iconoclastic, penetrating, original, funny, and thought-provoking.

Check out the latest issue.  What did you learn?  What articles would you recommend to the rest of this blog’s readership?  Comment on them.

“We Don’t Deserve Alexander Hamilton On Our Currency”

You’ve got to read Mollie Hemingway’s piece in the Federalist:  We Don’t Deserve Alexander Hamilton On Our Currency.  It defies excerpting.  It covers far more than just the woman-on-the-$10-bill issue.  I can’t explain it.  Just read it.  You’ll be glad you did.  Most of you.  Quite a few of you.

Todd exposes the war photo from space

The internet, newspapers, and television news have been showing this photograph of Israel and Gaza from outer space, purporting to show the explosions from the war in that region:

View image on Twitter

You know tODD, a super-commenter on this blog who specializes in throwing cold water on over-hyped and misinterpreted claims (including those I make in some of my posts, which I actually appreciate!).  He did some sleuthing and found that the photograph is showing nothing more than ordinary city lights!  He sent his findings to Mollie Hemingway, “the scourge of lazy journalists,” who then exposed the mistake, though I’m not seeing any retractions. [Read more...]

Mollie Hemingway: Washington’s coolest scourge

We’ve linked quite a bit to the work of my friend and friend-of-my-daughters Mollie Hemingway, a confessional Lutheran journalist who is now a senior editor at The Federalist (a lively site of wit and intellectual firepower that you will want to bookmark).  Well, she is having quite a bit of impact in our nation’s capital for her searing take-downs of bad journalism, her funny critiques of feminist orthodoxy, and her insightful defenses of religious liberty.

She is the subject of two recent profiles, linked and excerpted after the jump.  One is part of a “Portrait of a Modern Feminist” series in which Mollie denies that she is a feminist, but impresses the author with her “erudition and wit,” as well as with the fact that her columns have become the talk of the all-important Washington, D.C., dinner party circuit.  The other profile focuses on Mollie as “the scourge of lazy journalists.” [Read more...]

Journalism & vocation

Mollie Hemingway, who shamed the mainstream press into covering the Kermit Gosnell abortion mill murder trial, is getting attention for how she pulled that off.  I appreciate her plug for vocation and how that doctrine informs her pursuit of journalism. [Read more...]

Mollie Hemingway on her faith

The Washington Examiner has a series in which they interview people about their faith.  (They did that to me once, which I blogged about.)  Journalist Mollie Hemingway didn’t mince any words.  Read the whole interview.  Here is an excerpt in which Mollie explains vocation:

It seems in some ways that reporting on religion could lead to doubts about one’s own faith, or at least to confusion or pluralism. How has your journalism shaped or affected your own faith? Has it made you any more or less of an orthodox Lutheran?

That hasn’t been my experience at all. For one thing, my job as a reporter isn’t to advocate for one belief system over another. Rather, I aim to break news or explain trends, and allow individuals to tell their own story.

Lutherans study not just what we believe but what we don’t believe. So I already knew we held different doctrines as well as why. Nevertheless, I have found that learning more about other faiths has generally strengthened my own. I have seen new religious ceremonies and structures and met wonderful atheists, pagans, Druze, Jains, Muslims, Jews, Mormons, Evangelicals and Catholics. Some of my conversations with them have challenged me, but in general I’ve found that it makes me appreciate Lutheran teachings much more. The best example of this is that I used to be attracted to unbelief. While I still enjoy reporting on atheists and have many non-believing friends, learning more about atheism and its history has cured me of any attraction to it.

Many people consider a vocation to be an occupation — or maybe an occupation that’s especially satisfying. How does the Lutheran understanding of vocation extend beyond our careers?

Lutherans have a special understanding of vocation. It’s not limited to one’s job but every single relationship I have, including parent, child, friend, neighbor, parishioner and citizen. It’s any position in which I am the instrument through which God works in the world.

So, for instance, God heals us by giving us doctors and nurses. He feeds us by giving us farmers and bakers. He gives us earthly order through our governors and legislators, and he gives us life through our parents. God is providing all these gifts — but we receive them from our neighbors.

Luther wrote that fathers should not complain when they have to rock a baby, change his diaper, or care for the baby’s mother, but instead should view each act as a holy blessing. Everything we do in service to others is a holy blessing.

At your core, what is one of your defining beliefs?

I believe, with the Apostles, that Jesus Christ is the God-man who died to redeem the world from sin, rose bodily from the dead, and will raise me in the body on the last day.

via Credo: Mollie Hemingway | Leah Fabel | People | Washington Examiner.