Death penalty for helping a missionary

Thirty-three people have been arrested and face the death penalty in North Korea for helping a missionary in his efforts to set up a network of 500 underground churches. [Read more...]

The language of totalitarianism

The “Dear Leader” of North Korea, Kim Jong Un, has executed his uncle, who had served as his advisor and mentor.   Max Fisher writes about the language the still-Communist North Koreans used to make this announcement and the worldview it reveals.  [Read more...]

The death penalty for possessing a Bible

North Korea executed 80 people, in some cases, tying them to stakes and machine-gunning them before 10,000 spectators of all ages assembled in a sports stadium.  Among the crimes:  possessing a Bible. [Read more...]

Why we don’t have to worry about North Korea

A new strategy for national defense:  hope the enemy’s weapons don’t work.

The Defense Intelligence Agency has concluded that North Korea “has nuclear weapons capable of delivery by ballistic missiles; however, the reliability will be low.”

[Read more...]

North Korea threatens war, maybe today or tomorrow

North Korea has threatened to nuke Hawaii, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Austin, Texas.  Now the Stalinist regime is saying that war could break out “today or tomorrow.”  We have heard threats from North Korea before–though not like these–and we always dismiss them on the grounds that North Korea’s leadership is certifiably insane.  That’s supposed to make us feel better?  A lunatic with nuclear weapons is the worst kind.  “Mutually-assured destruction” is not a deterrent for a lunatic.  Another reason not to worry is that North Korea is a failed state in desperate poverty.  That an adversary is “desperate” is no consolation, since there is always the option of going out in a blaze of glory.  There is also that whole face-saving thing so important, I am told, to Koreans that makes it harder to back down.

We can feel better knowing that experts say the country does not have the technical capability to launch missiles that will reach all that far.  Let’s hope the experts are right this time.  We have sent ships and anti-missile technology to our allies and  military bases in the region.  China is even moving military units to its borders with North Korea, not knowing what the new “dear leader” Kim Jong-Un might do. [Read more...]

North Korea says it will nuke America

North Korea said it “will exercise the right to a preemptive nuclear attack to destroy the strongholds of the aggressors and to defend the supreme interests of the country.”  Meanwhile, the UN unanimously passed new sanctions against the eccentric but nuclear-armed communist nation, with even China–which usually protects its client state by exercising vetoes–going along.  The White House says not to worry, that we could shoot down a North Korean missile, if they have one that would reach us, which they supposedly don’t.

I know that North Korea is always blustering and threatening.  But history has shown that it is unwise to dismiss what dictators and terrorists promise that they will do.  Hitler laid out his plans quite early, but hardly anyone took him seriously, until he started carrying them out.  It may take North Korea awhile to develop long-range missiles, but isn’t this evidence of what they intend to do with them?  Can we afford to just laugh at the North Koreans?  But can we do anything other than wait to see if they are serious? [Read more...]

America’s enemy list update

Hugo Chavez, the Marxist anti-American president of Venezuela, has died of cancer.   Meanwhile, nuclear-armed North Korea has said it will cancel the 1953 cease-fire that ended the Korean War, due to American sanctions and joint military exercises with South Korea.  And Secretary of State John Kerry rattled his  sabre at Iran, threatening military action if Iran acquires nuclear weapons and announcing that the U.S. will give non-lethal aid to Syrian rebels. [Read more...]

North Korea threatens to nuke America

Still-Communist North Korea says that it will not only continue to develop its nuclear weapons program, but it will also develop long-range rockets and target its nuclear missiles at the United States.  “Settling accounts with the US needs to be done with force, not with words,” the North Korean government says. [Read more...]

A bad year for dictators

The North Korean “dear leader” Kim Jong-Il is dead.  His son, twenty-something Kim Jong-Un, has been named his successor.  The military is running a missile-test, as if to warn the world to stay back.

2011:  A bad year for dictators.  Gaddafi overthrown and killed.  Mubarak thrown out.  Hassad and Putin facing unrest.  And now this.

What do you think will happen now?  Will North Korea take the chance to join with its prosperous relatives in the South, or keep the starvation and mass oppression of Communism going?

via Kim Jong-Il dies, North Korea rallies around son – Yahoo! News.

See also Mollie Hemingway’s account of the brutality of the Kim Jong-Il regime and how it especially targeted Christians.

Christmas tree as a “dangerous, rash act”

North Korea has backed off of its military threats, after shelling South Korean territory, but the South Koreans are still angry and defiant.  In addition to mobilizing their military, the South Koreans have resumed a practice that had been halted for seven years out of deference to the North’s sensibilities.  The South Koreans have allowed the lighting of a giant Christmas tree within sight of  communist territory.  The atheist regime is outraged.

As troops stood guard and a choir sang carols Tuesday, South Koreans lit a massive steel Christmas tree that overlooks the world’s most heavily armed border and is within sight of atheist North Korea.

The lighting of the tree after a seven-year hiatus marked a pointed return to a tradition condemned in Pyongyang as propaganda. The provocative ceremony – which needs government permission – was also a sign that President Lee Myung-bak’s administration is serious about countering the North’s aggression with measures of its own in the wake of an artillery attack that killed four South Koreans last month. . . .

Although the North has made some conciliatory gestures in recent days – indicating to a visiting U.S. governor that it might allow international inspections of its nuclear programs – Seoul appears unmoved.

Pyongyang has used a combination of aggression and reconciliation before to extract concessions from the international community, and the resurrection of the tree lighting at Aegibong is a signal that the South is ready to play hardball until it sees real change from the North. . . .

On Aegibong Peak, about a mile from the Demilitarized Zone that divides the Korean peninsula, marines toting rifles circled the Christmas tree as more than 100,000 twinkling lights blinked on. The brightly lit tree – topped with a cross – stood in stark relief to North Korea, where electricity is limited.

Choir members in white robes trimmed in blue and wearing red scarves and Santa Claus hats gathered beneath the steel structure draped with multicolored lights, illuminated stars and snowflakes. An audience of about 200 listened as they sang “Joy to the World” and other Christmas carols.

“I hope that Christ’s love and peace will spread to the North Korean people,” said Lee Young-hoon, a pastor of the Seoul church that organized the lighting ceremony. About 30 percent of South Koreans are Christian.

The 100-foot steel tree sits on a peak high enough for North Koreans in border towns to see it and well within reach of their country’s artillery. Defense Minister Kim Kwan-jin said an attack from North Korea was certainly possible but unlikely.

North Korea, officially atheist and with only a handful of sanctioned churches in Pyongyang with services for foreigners, warned that lighting the tree would constitute a “dangerous, rash act” with the potential to trigger a war.

As a precaution, dozens of armed troops took up position around the site during the lighting ceremony. Ambulances and fire trucks were parked nearby. Instructions placed on chairs at the ceremony advised participants to take cover in case of an attack.

“The danger of the enemy’s threat still exists,” the leaflet read, suggesting that participants hide behind concrete walls, crouch between chairs and move quickly to shelters in case of an attack.

The event took place uninterrupted.

via South Korean Christmas tree sign of new propaganda war | Tulsa World.