Supreme Court upholds Obamacare

The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Obamacare, saying that the language of a  passage in the Affordable Care Act that limited subsidies to states that established insurance exchanges should not be allowed to undermine the larger purpose of the bill.

“In this instance,” wrote Chief Justice Roberts, “the context and structure of the act compel us to depart from what would otherwise be the most natural reading of the pertinent statutory phrase.”  Dissenting Justice Scalia said,   “We should start calling this law SCOTUScare,” citing the two decisions supporting the health care law, which “will publish forever the discouraging truth that the Supreme Court of the United States favors some laws over others, and is prepared to do whatever it takes to uphold and assist its favorites.”

Responded President Obama to his victory, “The Affordable Care Act is here to stay.” [Read more...]

Supremes hear case on Obamacare language

The Supreme Court heard arguments yesterday on the most serious legal challenge to Obamacare so far.  At issue in King v. Burwell is whether the language in the Affordable Care Act that provides for federal subsidies for health insurance policies purchased in exchanges “established by the state” applies also to the policies purchased in the 34 states that refused to establish exchanges.

The clumsily written and largely unvetted law and the way it is being applied poses other questions for the court:  Does a law mean what it says, or what it surely must mean?  Do the words in a law mean what was originally intended (there is evidence that the writers of the law actually intended the provision to apply to state exchanges only in order to coerce states to establish them) or what the bureaucracy wants it to mean? [Read more...]

Obamacare employer mandate goes into effect

Now that it’s 2015, the next phase of Obamacare kicks in:  Employers of more than 100 people must give them insurance benefits.   This provision of the Affordable Care Act had been delayed by executive decree, but now it goes into effect.

Most employers in this range already provide health insurance to their employees, though the law does change things for the companies.  For example, those who work as many as 30 hours must now get insurance, even though they are not full time.

This time next year, the mandate will apply to smaller businesses those of 50 or more workers.  Businesses that hire fewer than 50 are not covered in the law and will not have to insure their employees. [Read more...]

The Obamacare confession

When I heard about the Obama operative who said that the passage of Obamacare was helped by Americans’ “stupidity,” I assumed it was just a gaffe, with which Republicans could play “gotcha.”  But it turns out, the comment was in the context of a frank explanation in front of a friendly liberal audience at MIT about how the administration got Obamacare through Congress.

And the operative’s other comments are even more damaging to the bill.  A second video supports the opponents’ of the law’s case before the Supreme Court by indicating that the language restricting subsidies to state exchanges was intentional. [Read more...]

The revised contraceptive mandate

In response to the Supreme Court decision that the Obamacare contraception mandate can violate the religious liberty of pro-life business owners, the administration has issued new regulations that would allow employees to get free birth control–including those that prevent the implantation of the fertilized egg–without violating the religious convictions of employers.

See the details after the jump.  Does this solve the problem? [Read more...]

Contradictory court rulings on Obamacare subsidies

One federal appeals court threw out the Obamacare subsidies, but hours later, another federal appeals court upheld them! [Read more...]


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