Quantum physics is oppressive

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Quantum physics is oppressive, according to a feminist scholar, because it promotes “binary and absolute differences.”  This makes it “hierarchical and exploitative.”  As such, it is “part of the system that enables oppression.”

This is an example of the anti-intellectualism and Stalinism that is plaguing the academic world.  Stalinist because it subjects all knowledge and culture–including scientific findings–to a political critique.  It then seeks to silence and punish scientists, artists, and intellectuals who do not conform to the Marxist, or, in this case, post-Marxist worldview.

But it raises another issue.  The scholar contends, in effect, that the structure of nature–as physicists have studied it–teaches that there are “binary” differences.  For example, positive and negative charges, which she contends encourages people to think in terms of male and female.

She believes that conclusions drawn from nature should be suppressed in the name of social causes. She thinks we should replace quantum physics with what she calls “quantum feminisms.”

But what if society, culture, and human beings are tied to nature?  Maybe nature really has binary differences and this is why society and the human mind also have them.  This is part of what classical thinkers mean by natural law, that human social and moral life are not arbitrary or humanly-made constructions; rather, they are connected to nature; that is, to reality. [Read more…]

The infinite number of universes

Multiverse_-_level_IIAstrophysicist Ethan Siegel has written an article explaining how the infinite number of parallel universes, as hypothesized by quantum theorists, could actually be real.

After explaining the quantum theory behind the idea, Siegel gives three possibilities of how infinite universes could be a reality.  If it is, he says, “everything that was ever possible happened somewhere.”

“Somewhere, the Nazis won World War II; somewhere, Hillary Clinton is president; somewhere, humans have driven themselves to extinction; somewhere, we’ve achieved world peace.”

And somewhere, there was a God who designed and created a particular universe.  Maybe this is that universe!

I am astonished at how these scientists can bandy about “infinity” as they do, positing an infinite number of infinities, since each quantum reaction–and how many of those are there?–creates a new universe.  And yet I’m sure that they would not allow for a single infinite God who holds together all contingent events.

“But there is no evidence for a God!” they will say.  But there is certainly no evidence for infinite universes, nor is such evidence even theoretically possible, since we can only observe our own universe.  This theory is a deductive philosophical construction based on mathematical projections.  But it’s hard to see how it is qualitatively superior than philosophical metaphysics or theological speculation.

[Read more…]

Unthinkable experiments

Theologians have long talked about the limits of our finite human reason when it comes to comprehending the infinite God.  Now scientists are up against the limits of our finite human reason when it comes to comprehending finite nature.

Scientific American has a fascinating survey of facts that are “unthinkable” in quantum physics:  particles that are in two places at the same time; objects that spin in two opposite directions at the same time; objects that are entangled with each other, so that what happens to one affects the other, no matter how far apart they are; etc.

This is part of an account of how scientists are using computers to propose “unintuitive configurations” that the human mind would be unlikely to come up with. [Read more…]

Math discrepancy in astrophysics

There is energy even in a vacuum.  But the amount predicted by quantum physics and the actual measurements are off by a factor of 1 followed by 120 zeroes.  This discrepancy is described as “one of the most confounding (and embarrassing) problems in modern astrophysics.”  It would suggest that there is something wrong with the mathematical models behind quantum physics, something scientists are reluctant to admit.  So they are looking for other explanations, including the final all-purpose answer when scientists don’t know something:  the invocation of multiple universes.

After the jump is an excerpt from an account of a panel discussing this problem, which develops into a discussion of multiverses.  That solution is simply that if there are an infinite number of universes, we would have every possibility, including this unusual math fact, as well as the evolution of life, which they also get into.  (But that isn’t right, is it?   According to the mathematics of probability, random events continued on into infinity will not result in every possible action, much less result in a particular event.  Monkeys at typewriters will not eventually give us the works of Shakespeare, even in an infinite number of universes.)

Anyway, read the account.  Notice how the scientists say that the advantage of positing multiverses is that this avoids the necessity of agency!  They end by saying that all possible answers to the “anthropic principle” must be considered, but I don’t think they mean it. [Read more…]

Quantum teleportation

Scientists have teleported photons to a distance of 63 miles, a new record.  This “quantum teleportation” is not quite what happens on Star Trek, but it is another example of the strangeness of the universe as disclosed by quantum physics.  [Read more…]

The sound an atom makes

The ancients believed that the planets and stars were on crystalline spheres, whose turning created harmonics equivalent to our musical notes.  Hence, “the music of the spheres,” signifying the aesthetic order of the cosmos.   We don’t have that cosmology anymore, but we do have quantum physics.  Scientists have isolated the vibration and thus sound of a single atom.  It is the musical note, D. [Read more…]