Saudi Arabia threatens U.S. economy over 9/11 charges

There is reportedly evidence–censored pages of the official 9/11 report–that some of the 9/11 terrorists received funding from Saudi Arabia, possibly including Saudi officials.    A bill in Congress would allow Saudi Arabia to be held liable in any court proceedings.  Now Saudi Arabia is saying that if that bill passes, it will sell off its $750 billion in American treasury notes and other assets.  This could dramatically lower their value and harm the U.S. economy.

Beyond this specific issue (more details on that after the jump), the Saudi threat shows a big vulnerability in national security.  Countries that own lots of American property or that America owes lots of money to have leverage over us.  What if China cashed out its holdings in the United States?  Or simply stopped buying American debt?  Our national debt is being funded, in large part, by selling our bonds overseas.  Which not only makes us dependent, but makes us vulnerable to foreign coercion, as the Saudis are trying to do. [Read more…]

Sunni vs. Shiite conflict intensifies

In another reminder that the turmoil in the Middle East is not all about us, the Saudis executed, along with 46 criminals, a prominent Shiite leader.  Protests have broken out throughout the Muslim world.  Iranians have occupied the Saudi embassy, and the two countries have severed diplomatic relations.

Those two types of Islam are hostile to each other, about like Catholics and Protestants during the 30 Year’s War.  Many of the predations of ISIS, which is Sunni (as is al-Qaida), have targeted Shiites, whose center is Iran.  Some Islamic countries, like Iraq and Syria, have mixed populations, which is a big reason for their instability. [Read more…]

Taking someone else’s punishment

What would Jesus do?  Take your punishment to free you from condemnation.

A Saudi blogger has been sentenced to 1000 lashes for criticizing Islamic clerics.  So seven religious freedom advocates, including the well-known conservative scholar Robert P. George, are offering to take the floggings in his place. [Read more…]

A king dies, but the new king has dementia

Saudi Arabia is trying to hurt the American domestic oil industry by pumping so much oil that it drives down prices so as to make fracking unprofitable.  And yet, that helps Americans with low gasoline prices.  Saudi Arabia is the center of arch-conservative Sunni Islam, but has been a key American ally against ISIS.  Saudi Arabian despotism creates Islamist rebels, but American foreign policy sees it as a force for stability in the Middle East.  Saudi Arabia outlaws Christianity within its borders, but tends to be on the side of America’s government.

Now this important but contradictory nation is suddenly facing a crisis.  Its king, 90-year-0ld King Abdullah, has died.  Its odd laws of succession give the kingship to the various sons of the founding monarch, and, thanks to Islamic polygamy, there are 35 of them.  So the throne goes to the various brothers of the previous king, rather than to the next generation.  So the new king of Saudi Arabia is 79 years old and reportedly suffers from dementia. [Read more…]

A key royal in Saudi Arabia dies

Yet another Arab strongman has died, the crown prince of Saudi Arabia.  He was the heir to the throne, but a powerful ruler in his own right.  The current king is 87 and sick.  Expect another chapter in the Arab Spring:

Saudi Arabia’s ruling monarchy moved into a critical period of realignment Saturday after the death of the heir to the throne opened the way for a new crown prince: most likely a tough-talking interior minister who has led crackdowns on Islamic militants but also has shown favor to ultraconservative traditions such as keeping the ban on women voting.

A state funeral is planned for Tuesday in Riyadh for crown prince Sultan bin Abdul-Aziz Al Saud, who died in New York at the age of 80 after an unspecified illness, the official Saudi Press Agency said.

Now, Saudi rulers are expected to move quickly to name the new king-in-waiting — which royal protocol suggests will be Sultan’s half brother, Prince Nayef.

Moving Nayef to the top of the succession ladder would not likely pose any risks to Saudi Arabia’s pro-Western policies and, in particular, its close alliance with Washington. But Nayef cuts a much more mercurial figure than Saudi’s current leader, the ailing King Abdullah, who has nudged ahead with reforms such as promising women voting rights in 2015 despite rumblings from the country’s powerful religious establishment.

Nayef, 78, has earned U.S. praise for unleashing the internal security forces against suspected Islamic extremist cells in Saudi Arabia, which was home to 15 of 19 of the Sept. 11 hijackers. Yet he brought blistering rebukes in the West for a 2002 interview that quoted him as saying that “Zionists” — a reference to Jews — benefited from the 9-11 attacks because it turned world opinion against Islam and Arabs.

Nayef also has expressed displeasure at some of Abdullah’s moves for more openness, saying in 2009 that he saw no need for women to vote or participate in politics. It’s a view shared by many Saudi clerics, who follow a strict brand of Islam known as Wahhabism. Their support gives the Saudi monarchy the legitimacy to rule over a nation holding Islam’s holiest sites.

“Nayef is more religious, and is closer to the Saudi groups who are very critical of the king’s decisions regarding women and other steps he’s taken to balance out the rigid religious practices in society,” said Ali Fakhro, a political analyst and commentator in Bahrain.

via Death of Saudi crown prince puts succession spotlight on critic of reforms – The Washington Post.


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