Supremes reject Obama’s “recess” appointments

The Constitution’s balance of powers is re-asserting itself.  President Obama had been appointing officials that need Senate approval by doing so during holidays when Senators were out of town.  Since the Constitution allows for temporary appointments when the Senate is in recess (back when the Senate was a part time body with long periods between sessions), the President claimed these short holiday breaks constituted a “recess,” even though the Senate was still in session.

The Supreme Court has ruled–unanimously!–that these appointments  are illegal.  The Judicial branch is reining in the Executive Branch in its attempts to exert its power at the expense of the Legislative branch.  The Constitution still works. [Read more...]

Supremes rule for cell phone privacy

The Obama administration and the state of California argued that law enforcement officials should be able to go through the information on a person’s cell phone, which they argued was no different from asking someone to turn out his pockets.  But the Supreme Court, striking a blow for privacy in 21st century technology, ruled–unanimously, no less–that cell phone data (which includes not just call records but with your calendar and appointments a record of nearly all of your activities) is private and cannot be accessed by authorities without a warrant. [Read more...]

Supreme Court allows Christian prayers in public meetings

The Supreme Court has ruled that public meetings, including those involving local governments, may feature distinctly Christian prayers, including those that are in the name of Jesus. [Read more...]

Supreme Court vs. Affirmative Action

Is a law racially discriminatory if it forbids racial discrimination?  The Supreme Court ruled “no,” upholding a Michigan referendum that forbids racial considerations–that is, affirmative action programs– in college admissions. [Read more...]

How the Hobby Lobby argument went

Here is an account, by reporter Robert Barnes, of the argument before the Supreme Court over the Obamacare contraception mandate:

A divided Supreme Court seemed inclined to agree Tuesday that the religious beliefs of business owners may trump a requirement in President Obama’s Affordable Care Act that they provide their employees with insurance coverage for all types of contraceptives. [Read more...]

Supremes hear Hobby Lobby’s case today

Today the Supreme Court hears the case being brought by Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood Specialties challenging the Obamacare mandate that pro-life business owners, as well as non-church religious institutions, must provide their employees health insurance that includes contraceptives and “morning after” pills.

After the jump, a remarkably cogent explanation of why pro-life Christians need to oppose the law’s provisions from Matthew Harrison, the president of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod.  (Note particularly what he says about the administration’s offer of compromise, that in cases of conscience insurance companies can just provide the “services” for free.) [Read more...]


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