The Teenage Brain

Parents have long been frustrated with their teenager’s “what was he thinking” moments.  Why do bright, thoughtful adolescents so often do things that are foolish and reckless?  We now know the reason:  their brains are not finished growing.  Specifically, the pleasure center is not completely hooked up to the judgement center.

The good news is that, contrary to what people used to believe, the teenage brain can change, which means that there really are “late bloomers.”

Neurologist Frances Jensen, with journalist Amy Ellis Nutt, as written a book on the subject The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults.  Read from a review after the jump. [Read more...]

Young people are getting better

We old fogies are always complaining about “the younger generation.”  But today’s teenagers and young adults actually have a much better record than their peers from the past (including when we old fogies were young fogies).  Crime rates, promiscuity, substance abuse, bullying, and suicide rates among young people are way, way down.  (Any ideas why that might be?) [Read more...]

Discovery of how to keep young people in the church

A new study has discovered what is being called the “holy grail” for keeping teenagers in the church when they become adults:  Parents.   If their parents talked about their faith at home, showed that their faith is important to them, and were active in church, 82% of their children became similarly religious as adults.  The connection is “nearly deterministic,” according to one researcher. [Read more...]

What’s the matter with kids these days?

My former student Brett Harris shows that he was paying attention when our literature class studied irony.  But notice his overall point:

Young people have absolutely NOTHING to offer. The sooner they realize this and stop trying to do grownup stuff the better for everyone.

For example, this 13-year-old girl got so overwhelmed visiting a neonatal unit in Kenya that she ran outside and passed out!

LET’S FACE IT: Young people are too incompetent and irresponsible to make a difference in the world. They should focus on staying entertained and out of the way.

Unfortunately, this girl didn’t learn her lesson the first time. [Read more...]

Teenagers are losing interest in driving?

You thought it strange that Japanese young adults are losing interest in sex?  How about American teenagers who are losing interest in driving?  Only half of teenagers have a driver’s license by the time they are 18.  Twenty years ago two-thirds did.

After the jump, a report on the phenomenon.  The study cited, sponsored by the automobile industry, blames the economy and expresses the hope that teenagers will want to drive again once the economy improves.  But I’m not sure that’s what the data shows. [Read more...]

How teenagers buy music today

The music industry is struggling because so much of its product can be accessed for free, what with YouTube and “radio” sites such as Pandora (setting aside illegal downloads).  But even when a person wants to buy music, it’s hard if you aren’t old enough for a credit card.  And it’s even harder if you want to buy music your parents wouldn’t approve of.  From Aaron Leitko:

The Internet has given kids boundless opportunities to hear music gratis, but few ways to pay for it.

To shop for mp3s on iTunes or Amazon, you need a credit card or debit card. If you’re a minor with an allowance, you probably don’t have either. . . .

If your tastes don’t align with Best Buy’s music buyer, you’ll have to turn to iTunes. And your folks, who control the purse strings.

“Right now, most kids are using parents’ iTunes accounts or otherwise relying on parental permission to make their purchases,” says Mary Madden, a researcher at the Pew Internet and American Life Project. The only hiccup: The songs that teenagers want to hear and the songs their parents let them hear are often very different. Leveraging chores in exchange for Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” (uncensored version, of course), the Tool discography or anything Odd Future-related is for brazen teens with particularly liberal or oblivious parents. For the rest, an awkward conversation about the record’s content is inevitable — unless they get their hands on a gift card.

“This is kind of the untold genius of iTunes that’s not spoken about, when it comes to teenagers, is the gift card,” says Crupnick, who estimates that two-thirds of the money teens spend online is with such cards. . . .

“They only ever pay for music out of respect for the artist,” MTV researcher Mariana Agathoklis says. “They almost view that as a way to show off their fandom, where it used to be that you would follow an artist on tour, you would look like them and wear their T-shirts.” A record is no longer an impulse buy — it’s patronage.

via How can you be a rebel if you use Mom’s iTunes account? – The Washington Post.


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