New video on vocation

The Christian History Institute has put out a two-part video on vocation.  It’s called Going on Vocation.  I’m in it.  See the trailer after the jump. [Read more...]

The sacrifice of Christians

Rev. Adam Roe, in the series on vocation at MissionWork, discusses the concept of “sacrifice” in the Lutheran confessions.  Unlike in Roman Catholicism, Holy Communion is not seen as a sacrifice, nor are pastors considered priests who offer up sacrifices.  And yet Christians are called to sacrifice, but not for the forgiveness of sins, since Christ, who is both our Priest and our Sacrifice, has accomplished the only sacrifice we need.  But the Apology of the Augsburg Confession does speak about the sacrifices that pastors and all Christians perform. [Read more...]

Super-Christians & vows against vocation

In the second in Mission Work’s series on a Lutheran perspective on faith & work, Rev. Adam Roe offers a post entitled No super-Christians.  He discusses Luther’s reaction against the view that those who want to be particularly spiritual–”super-Christians”–would become monks, nuns, or priests.  These were considered callings from God–”vocations”–while lay occupations were not.

I would add that the specific way that a person became a “super-Christian” contributed to the problem:  A person who sought to become “religious” took–and still takes–vows.  [Read more...]

Priesthood of all believers and vocation

The blog Mission Work, which focuses on faith, work, and economics, is hosting a series on the Lutheran perspective on these issues, also known as the doctrine of vocation.  Every few days for several weeks, it will post some reflections by Rev. Adam Roe, a pastor in the Lutheran Congregations in Mission for Christ (LCMC).  I’ve been asked to respond to what he has to say.  His first post is about the Priesthood of All Believers. [Read more...]

The higher calling of corporate mission statements

Thanks to David Bergquist for alerting me to an article in the Wall Street Journal about how corporate mission statements are now all about “changing the world” and other idealistic and even religious motivations (including having a “mission”), rather than just making a product.   This demonstrates both people’s need for a sense of vocation and their misunderstanding about what a vocation actually entails.

Read an excerpt and follow the link after the jump, then consider what I have to say about this. [Read more...]

The military procedural

The American Sniper movie is stirring up big controversy in some circles for supposedly glorifying war.  But it’s also a monster hit, possibly on its way to becoming the most popular war movie ever.  Film critic Ann Hornaday says that it’s an example of a new kind of war movie:  the military procedural.

On television, police procedurals have become extremely popular, stories that concentrate on showing how police officers do their jobs.  All of the shows about forensics specialists, physicians, lawyers, etc., are of the same type, showing professionals at work as they overcome obstacles and accomplish the tasks set before them.  That is to say, all of these procedurals are about vocation! [Read more...]


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