Making America great again through vocation

Mark Hemingway excoriates the left’s denigration of work and says that the lack of respect for the working class is what drives Donald Trump’s popularity.  And then he offers his proposal for making America great again:  Recover Luther’s doctrine of vocation!

Read what he says after the jump.  This will kick off a special series of posts on vocation this week (while I’m away in Denmark).  As someone* wrote me recently, “vocation has messed with me for the past several years.”  Let it mess with you this week!

[Read more…]

Labor & Leisure

Labor Day heralds the end of summer vocations.  Now the Fall begins and it’s back to work.  For students and teachers like me, it has always meant getting serious again and going back to the classrooms for another school year.

This year, for me, the holiday is hitting me in a completely different way since I am retiring.  All summer I have been madly busy finishing up my job, so Labor Day is heralding the beginning of my not laboring, at least in the same way I have all of my life. [Read more…]

“Fish in the afternoon, criticize after dinner”

At the findings that Obamacare will take over 2 million jobs out of the economy, Democrats have been saying this is a good thing:  Now, people will no longer have to work at unfulfilling jobs just to keep their health insurance.  Charles Krauthammer takes up this mindset and throws in a great quote from Karl Marx. [Read more…]

Books on Faith and Work

The doctrine of vocation, though neglected for a long time, is coming back in force.  Though “vocation” refers to God’s various callings in which we are to love and serve our neighbors and goes far beyond a “job,” it does include what we do to make a living.  Quite a few books have come out recently on what is being called the “Faith and Work conversation.”  Greg Forster has written a useful review essay online with links to the various titles.

I appreciate what he said about my book on vocation:  “Gene Edward Veith’s classic God at Work demonstrates that faith/work integration is indispensable if we wish to uphold the Reformation doctrine of justification by faith alone.”

A classic already?  Don’t I have to be dead to have a book attain that status?  But I’ll take it.  I’m glad Dr. Forster sees what is so often missed:  That vocation is connected to justification. [Read more…]

Lutherans, Calvinists, & Evangelicals on vocation

Tim Keller, the well-respected pastor of Redeemer Prebyterian Church in New York, City, has written a book about vocation entitled Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God’s Work.  I haven’t read it yet, though I’m ordering it, but from what I’ve heard and read on the preview at Amazon (click the link), it looks promising.  Also, he “gets” what Luther is saying and expresses warm appreciation for the Lutheran doctrine of vocation.  What intrigues me is what he says about the different emphases of Lutheran, Calvinist, Evangelical, and Mainline Protestant treatments of vocation and the Christian’s life in the world.  After the jump, see what he says in an interview in Christianity Today. [Read more…]

Is the purpose of work leisure?

The New York Times published an online column arguing that the purpose of work is leisure.  (We work for the sake of the weekend; we have a career so we can retire; we try to amass wealth so we can stop working.)  That is also the view of Aristotle (we need to leisure to fully exercise our intellects) and of medieval Catholicism (the contemplative life is more spiritual than the active life).  Luther’s doctrine of vocation, by contrast, challenged this view, teaching that the purpose of work in all vocations is to love and serve one’s neighbor.

The folks at the Gospel Coalition blog asked me to pen an answer to the New York Times piece, which was by Notre Dame philosopher Gary Gutting.  I did.  Go here to read my response, which includes a link to Prof. Gutting’s essay:

The Purpose of Work – The Gospel Coalition Blog.

 


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