Norway Abolishes State Church

State churches are a really bad idea, and they always have been. Now that Norway is almost a completely post-Christian culture (only 2% of the population attends services), there’s no reason for them to pretend any more.

In an unprecedented move, the Norwegian Parliament has voted to abolish the state-sponsored Church of Norway with a constitutional amendment.

The bipartisan measure to create a separation of church and state will officially be presented on Tuesday, reports Norway’s TV2. The nation will not have an official religion, and the government will not participate in the appointment of church deans and bishops.

Svein Harberg, the spokesman for the Church, Education, and Research Committee stated that the decision “is historic both for the Norwegian Church and for the politicians in Parliament.”

The Church of Norway began after the Lutheran Reformation in 1536, and was officially called the Lutheran State Church. The state meddled very little in church matters, only quelling unrest when it had to, chose high church officials, and financially supported the church. Opposition from secular groups arose in the 1970s when Norway’s economy boomed and the church benefited.

About Thomas L. McDonald

Thomas L. McDonald writes about technology, theology, history, games, and shiny things. Details of his rather uneventful life as a professional writer and magazine editor can be found in the About tab.

  • Loud

    Oh, it didn’t meddle much. It ONLY selected the HIGHEST officials….. not much….


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