A Middle English Poem About the Assumption

As a footnote to my posts about the last days of Mary, here’s a lovely little Middle English poem about the Assumption. It’s a pretty easy read, but I translated it anyway to clarify a couple of obscure words.

Crist sayde to hur:
“Com, my swete, com, my flour,
Com, my culver, myn owne boure,
Com, my modyr, now wyth me:
For hevyn qwene I make thee.”

Then the body sat up, and lowted to Crist, and sayde:
“My swete sonne, with al my love
I com wyth thee to thyn above;
Wher thou art now, let me be,
For al my love ys layde on thee.”

Translation

Christ visited the body of Mary, and said:
“Come my sweet, come my flower,
Come my dove, come my bower,
Come, my mother, now with me,
For heaven’s Queen I make thee.”

Then the body sat up, bowed to Christ, and said:
“My sweet son, with all my love
I come with you to heaven above:
Where you are now, let me be
For all my love I lay on thee.”

About Thomas L. McDonald

Thomas L. McDonald writes about technology, theology, history, games, and shiny things. Details of his rather uneventful life as a professional writer and magazine editor can be found in the About tab.

  • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

    That is a lovely little poem. Is there more information on it? From what part of England (I assume it was from England) and roughly when was it written?

  • http://www.godandthemachine.com/ Thomas L. McDonald

    The author is unknown. It appears in a collection of sermon helps by John Mirk (14th c), but it’s unlikely he wrote it. Most Middle English lyrics are unattributed.

  • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

    Thanks. The spelling looks about Chaucer’s period.


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